Tag Archives: inflammation

Recent Kawasaki Disease-Like Inflammatory Condition in the News

You may have heard about the children recently who have been suffering from some sort of inflammatory issues, in which the condition has been compared to Kawasaki disease and toxic shock syndrome. The children have also suffered from multisystem organ failure. Well, it appears that some of the same suspects who have been exaggerating the seriousness of COVID-19 and participating in falsely inflating the COVID death numbers, and engaging in panic and fear-mongering, have been trying to tie those children’s inflammatory conditions to COVID-19.

There is a terrific article on the Children’s Health Defense website which goes into all the aspects of this so-far unexplained children’s inflammatory phenomenon. The article discusses Kawasaki disease and the possibility of vaccines being associated with that, and asks some important questions, including these that particularly interested me:

3. Did the children have any recent exposure to environmental toxins, including but not limited to mercury? A study of KD just published in northern Italy—the same highly air-polluted region heavily affected by COVID-19—reported a strong correlation between “the frequency of KD onsets and environmental factors,” including air pollutants; the study’s methodology did not permit the investigators to pinpoint which particulates might be responsible. U.S.-based studies have likewise linked KD to airborne environmental triggers. Could the same hold true for the “Kawasaki-like” illness being attributed to COVID-19?

4. What kinds of toxins might children be overexposed to while cooped up at home without “fresh air or sunlight”? Given that KD and toxic shock syndrome have both been linked to toxins, this is a question that warrants answers.

5. Is anyone assessing affected children’s recent vaccination history? As the large body of research linking KD and vaccines suggests, a child’s vaccination experiences—such as the timing of prior vaccination, the specific vaccines administered, whether the child received multiple vaccines all at once, and whether they received thimerosal-containing vaccines such as influenza vaccines—can provide important clues. Examining children’s prior (and possibly recent) influenza vaccine history is particularly pertinent because a 2018 CDC-supported study found an increased risk of acute respiratory illness (non-influenza) in influenza-vaccinated children compared to children who had not received a flu vaccine. In adults, a study published by the U.S. military in early 2020 also highlighted this issue, showing that soldiers who had received an influenza vaccine had a 36% increased risk of subsequent coronavirus infection. As studies are also proving that unvaccinated children are healthier, perhaps we should also be asking whether any KD or “PIMS” even occurs in unvaccinated children.

6. Could components of vaccines be functioning as superantigens, triggering “an unusual degree of immune activation”? Scientists who have studied the “distinctive immune system characteristics” of children with KD acknowledge that the “antigenic stimulation” set in motion by vaccines and other biologics has the capacity to create “immunologic interference.”

Autism and Inflammation

An article at Health Impact News, which I very much recommend, discusses some recent studies which show a link between brain inflammation and autism. A Tufts University study calls inflammation the “main driver behind autism,” and a Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center study found “evidence suggesting that an immune response targeting specialized cells in the brain resulted in chronic inflammation in two thirds of autistic brains analyzed postmortem,” according to Health Impact News.

The article points out other past studies showing a linkage between brain inflammation and autism. It also pointed to another study showing a linkage between intestinal inflammation and autism as well. The article notes that “67 percent (of children diagnosed with autism) more likely to be diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than their peers (not diagnosed with autism).”

The prevalence of autism diagnoses in children seems to have skyrocketed between 1980 and 2002, and especially since 2002.

Now, some particular contributors to brain inflammation and autism, as noted by the article, have been vaccines. Children are being given too many vaccine shots at too young an age.

And based on my own experiences and research, I would say that there are other contributors to inflammation as well.

Stress is a large contributor to inflammation, as shown in this article. And it shouldn’t be too much of a surprise that some children might have symptoms as a result of inflammation, because many children have a lot of emotional stress in their lives, especially those who are abused, molested, or neglected in the home.

Also, since the September 11th terrorist attacks of 2001, also known as 9/11, little children have been further stressed and terrorized by constant government pronouncements that “the terrorists are out to get us,” as repeated in the news media. The kids also are now exposed to totally unnecessary terrorism drills in the schools, and traveling children have been the victims of abuse, molesting and groping by TSA agents.

I don’t know how many photos or videos I have seen online or articles I’ve read regarding the crying little kids being criminally molested by the airport gestapo who believe that every little kid (and Grandma) is a terror suspect and anal cavity searches are in order. It’s sick.

Besides the TSA gestapo, the exaggerated terror threat and invasive “security” procedures that George W. Bush and Dick Cheney have caused and Obama and Trump have continued to authorize, today’s children are also having to deal with stressful situations in their own families. They have to deal with a mommy who is too distracted with her precious iPhone and texting while ignoring and neglecting her kid, or a daddy who is too preoccupied with his Internet porn, and so on.

So besides the parents too glued to their electronics, the kids themselves are spending too much time on their own devices, staring into screens all day, and that causes emotional stress as well. According to Psychology Today, kids spending too much time staring into their screens causes more stress and problems with sleep and mood, and actually can impede brain development in children.

So I can see how such stresses in a child’s life, certainly more than I had to deal with when I was growing up in the 1960s and ’70s, can contribute to inflammation.

Besides stress, there are other causes of inflammation. According to this 2018 Healthline article, sugar, sugary foods and high fructose corn syrup have been shown to cause more inflammation. But you probably already knew that. “In one study, mice fed high-sucrose diets developed breast cancer that spread to their lungs — in part due to the inflammatory response to sugar,” notes the Healthline article. And, “In another study, the anti-inflammatory impact of omega-3 fatty acids was impaired in mice fed a high-sugar diet.”

Hmm, that explains, at least in part, the ulcerative colitis (inflammation of the colon) relapses I continued to have during the years that I drank Ensure, which is high in sugar, as I wrote in my post on my medical ordeal.

Also in the Healthline article, besides the sugar and high fructose corn syrup, other food related contributors to inflammation include artificial trans fats (as distinguished from natural trans fats found in dairy and meats), vegetable and seed oils (many of which are high in omega 6), refined carbohydrates (“found in candy, bread, pasta, pastries, some cereals, cookies, cakes, sugary soft drinks and all processed food that contains added sugar or flour”), excessive alcohol and processed meat.

I remember as a kid and even into my 20s eating those processed lunch meats. No wonder I had such problems. And I also ate a lot of junk food sweets. I can see the linkage of those products and probable inflammation, and the emotional and behavioral issues I had, as well as the ulcerative colitis I developed later on. I don’t want to say that I had actual “autism” as a kid. But I can say, given my years and experiences with ulcerative colitis, that I had “inflammation.”

Perhaps doctors can look more closely at possible diagnoses of inflammation in kids. People can prevent inflammation, not only by trying to reduce stress and eating foods that are known to have anti-inflammatory properties, but by not eating foods (mentioned above) that are known to cause inflammation.

Avoiding spending too much time staring into your electronics and screens can’t hurt either.

And I know I’ve thrown a lot of ideas into this one post, but it’s important to make connections, such as between autism and inflammation, and the causes of inflammation.