Category Archives: Nutritional supplements

Herman Cain and COVID-19, Vitamin D, and the Ventilators

Herman Cain was the black entrepreneur businessman who ran for president in 2012 with the slogan, “9-9-9,” which called for keeping income taxes and business taxes and imposing an awful, regressive national sales tax. Of course I disagreed with all that, and I agreed with Ron Paul at the time, who countered with “0-0-0”!

Anyway, Cain died this past week at age 74 supposedly of COVID-19. Cain had previously had stage 4 colon cancer that spread to his liver, from which he had recovered.

Some people who are obsessed with the social control agenda that goes along with the ongoing COVID fiasco, are concluding that Cain died because he attended a Trump rally and didn’t wear a mask. This is absurd, as he had been many places during that time including Arizona and could have gotten the coronavirus anywhere.

Actually, I think Cain died more because of vitamin D deficiency and I also think that his being on the ventilator made him worse off. Here is why I think those things.

First, as I wrote in this post in June, black people have been found to be vitamin D deficient, more than people of other races. And other studies have shown that a higher proportion of people who died of COVID-19 were vitamin D deficient.

Vitamin D is important for the immune system and it also specifically has natural antihistamine and anti-inflammatory properties. That means vitamin D can aid in clearing up not only nasal congestion (and that has been my personal experience, by the way) but more serious issues of fluid and inflammation in the lungs, which can occur in COVID-19 patients.

As I quoted in that earlier post from this study, “Vitamin D appears capable of inhibiting pulmonary inflammatory responses while enhancing innate defence mechanisms against respiratory pathogens.”

And I also quoted from a study on the NIH website: “Blacks and Hispanics consistently manifest lower serum concentrations of 25(OH)D than non-Hispanic whites [8–12], primarily because increased skin pigmentation inhibits cutaneous synthesis of cholecalciferol, the metabolic precursor to 25(OH)D [13]. This has led many investigators to conclude that blacks and Hispanics are at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency than whites [8–12], and as a result, may also have increased risk of developing associated chronic disease conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and cancer [14, 15].”

Now, it’s possible that Herman Cain had been taking vitamins including vitamin D, but I think that most people don’t take vitamin D, even though most people are probably vitamin D deficient, especially during the Winter months.

I say, shame-shame on the ruling medical establishment who rarely if ever emphasize the importance of nutrition in prevention or treatment of serious medical conditions or diseases, and the same goes for the mainstream news media who merely repeat what government bureaucrats and “public health” authorities tell them.

So besides the high probability of Herman Cain’s being vitamin D deficient which may have contributed to his difficult time with COVID-19, I think that his being put on a ventilator may also have contributed to his death.

According to the NY Post, “Cain spent nearly a month on a ventilator in an Atlanta hospital. In an update earlier this week, his family described a ‘long and slow process’ to recovery.”

“Long and slow,” thanks to the ventilator, that is. A previous article on NY Post pointed out a death rate of almost 90% of those COVID patients who were put on a ventilator. Which means that you are probably better off getting some alternative treatment, not a ventilator.

According to the NIH, which I quoted before,

One of the most serious and common risks of being on a ventilator is pneumonia. The breathing tube makes it hard for you to cough. Coughing helps clear your airways of germs that can cause infections. The breathing tube that is put into your airway can allow bacteria to enter your lungs. As a result, you may develop pneumonia.

Pneumonia is a major concern because people using ventilators are often already very sick. Pneumonia may make it harder to treat your other disease or condition. You may need special antibiotics, as the bacteria that caused your pneumonia could be resistant to standard antibiotics.

Another risk of being on a ventilator is a sinus infection. This type of infection is more common in people who have endotracheal tubes. Sinus infections are treated with antibiotics.

Using a ventilator can put you at risk for other problems, such as:

  • Atelectasis, a condition in which the lung does not expand fully. This causes the air sacs to collapse.
  • Blood clots. When using a ventilator, you may need to stay in bed or use a wheelchair. Staying in one position for long periods can raise your risk of blood clots and serious skin infections.
  • Fluid buildup in the air sacs inside your lungs, which are usually filled with air. This is called pulmonary edema.
  • Lung damage. Pushing too much air into the lungs or with too much pressure can harm your lungs. Too much oxygen can also damage your lungs. Babies put on a ventilator may be at a higher risk of lung infections or persistent lung problems as children and adults.
  • Muscle weakness. Using a ventilator decreases the work your diaphragm and other breathing muscles have to do, so they can become weak. This may lead to some problems and delays in being taken off the machine.
  • Pneumothorax. This is a condition in which air leaks out of the lungs and into the space between the lungs and the chest wall. This can cause pain and shortness of breath. It may cause one or both lungs to collapse.
  • Vocal cord damage. The breathing tube can damage your vocal cords. Tell your doctor if you have trouble speaking or breathing after your breathing tube is removed.

And I thank Jon Rappoport for this post he had in March, for pointing out the information on the ventilators.

Incidentally, that page on the NIH was changed a little since I quoted from it in April. In the earlier version of that page, the page referred to “ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP),” but in the current, edited version it’s just referred to as “pneumonia.”

But it sounds to me that Herman Cain had a higher risk of vitamin D deficiency because of his darker skin color, which may have contributed to his succumbing to COVID-19, and the fact that he was on the ventilator was probably not helpful.

I think a lot of illnesses and deaths can be prevented if only our supposedly modern and advanced society would emphasize the importance of nutrition.

Vitamin D Deficiency May Explain Why Black People Have Higher COVID Mortality Rates

An MIT study has found that race plays a major role, as much as age and one’s preexisting conditions, in a COVID-19 patient’s chance of survival. Apparently, black people have a higher death rate.

CBS Boston quotes the study author thus: “We controlled for that share of the population that has health insurance, diabetes, smoking, obesity. So, it’s got to be something that’s not that. It could be something like the quality of the insurance or the quality of the health care system.” In other words, they aren’t saying it overtly, but I think it is implied that the insurance and health care systems might be “racist,”  as a reference to “systemic racism” that we’ve been hearing about in the news these days.

But there is a good explanation in terms of certain dietary factors. Like lack of vitamin D is a good explanation, in my opinion. Northwestern University researchers have found that those COVID-19 patients with severe vitamin D deficiency have much higher COVID mortality rates.

Now, some people have criticized that study citing that mainly age is the relevant factor for COVID-19 fatality rates. A high percentage of the COVID-19 deaths are taking place in nursing homes. But the vitamin D deficiency theory makes sense to me given that COVID-19 involves the respiratory tract and fluid buildup in the lungs. According to this article published at NIH, “Vitamin D appears capable of inhibiting pulmonary inflammatory responses while enhancing innate defence mechanisms against respiratory pathogens.”

This article on The Lancet backs up those findings regarding vitamin D deficiency and COVID, citing additional studies, and it mentions that “black and minority ethnic people—who are more likely to have vitamin D deficiency because they have darker skin—seem to be worse affected than white people by COVID-19.”

This study on NIH states: “Blacks and Hispanics consistently manifest lower serum concentrations of 25(OH)D than non-Hispanic whites [8–12], primarily because increased skin pigmentation inhibits cutaneous synthesis of cholecalciferol, the metabolic precursor to 25(OH)D [13]. This has led many investigators to conclude that blacks and Hispanics are at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency than whites [8–12], and as a result, may also have increased risk of developing associated chronic disease conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and cancer [14, 15].” (And COVID-19?)

For some reason it really seems to be difficult to get mainstream medical practitioners, researchers and journalists to take the importance of nutrition (and malnutrition) seriously. It has been my own personal experience that mainstream doctors are either overly (and irrationally) faithful in the pharmaceutical industry or they are just dishonestly connected to those companies, or both.

Note how the government “public health experts” such as Dr. Fauci and our state officials rarely if ever even mention the importance of being nutritionally fit to defend against COVID-19 or any other type of disease including the flu.

But I think that the initial MIT researchers I mentioned at the top in their not even considering nutritional deficiencies and instead wanting to look at the insurance or health care systems, tells us something.

Governors Confused on What Is “Essential” During their Illegal Lockdowns

Among the many problems this whole societal shutdown has been causing me personally is the closing down of my local GNC, where I get a particular non-GNC brand name supplement that I haven’t been able to get anywhere else. And I don’t want to order things like supplements online and have them delivered! This store among many others were closed down because of being called “non-essential.” Maybe “non-essential” to you, fascist governor, but essential to ME!

You see, these ignorant moron politicians see liquor stores as “essential” so that is why those stores get to stay open.

So, nutrition=”non-essential,” while non-nutrition=”essential”! Only in what is becoming a third-world America, sadly.

My Latest Magnesium Update

Well, here we go again, it’s time to write another post on my latest dealings with nutritional supplements. Once again a magnesium update. Just to remind you, I take nutritional supplements because I have my digestive condition of ulcerative colitis and I can’t have most vegetables because many of them are mostly insoluble fiber, which is tough on a sensitive digestive system.

So as I had mentioned in the previous posts, I had been taking the Bluebonnet magnesium citrate, but it took me the longest time to acknowledge that it just wasn’t that good. I think that’s because when I started taking it it was very effective. That was about February to May of 2018. But during last Summer it was less effective, and I concluded that the warmer or more humid weather could have an effect on supplements.

And I thought I had learned in these past couple of years that magnesium citrate is a good idea if you’re taking it for your muscles, nerves and joints and don’t want it to cause a laxative effect like magnesium oxide. But noooo, even though magnesium citrate is said to absorb very well, it still can have that laxative effect. Well, with my digestive issues, I don’t want a laxative!

Apparently magnesium glycinate has a superior absorption and doesn’t cause a laxative effect. So by a few months ago I was then taking the Whole Foods Market 365 magnesium glycinate at breakfast and at dinner, 133 mg each, and just the one Bluebonnet magnesium citrate (200 mg) about two hours after breakfast as the extra magnesium.

But even that one extra tablet of Bluebonnet mag citrate at 200 mg per day was causing a laxative effect. And I don’t want to take a third WFM 365 tablet per day because unfortunately those contain a lot of “filler” ingredients, mainly “microcrystalline cellulose.” But I’m willing to take 2 WFM glycinate per day, because the other glycinate product that’s available in store is KAL magnesium glycinate, which is bad in the purity category.

However, for that second, extra tablet of the day, I replaced the Bluebonnet citrate with the Bluebonnet “chelated and buffered” magnesium, which is magnesium biglycinate (apparently the same as glycinate) but “buffered with magnesium oxide.” Well, the company says it is buffered with the magnesium oxide to make it easier on the digestive system. Which it wasn’t. And I KNOW that magnesium oxide is mainly a laxative. For some reason I was thinking that well if it’s buffered and chelated then the laxative effect would be almost non-existent. Nope.

So, for now I’m taking the two WFM 365, at breakfast and dinner, and taking one softgel of the Nature Made magnesium citrate as that extra one with its 125 mg per softgel. Based on my experience now I think that having two different forms of the magnesium is a good idea. And I know that magnesium citrate has a little bit of a laxative effect, but with the NM product it’s minimal. I know there are other, better products I can get online but I don’t want to order things online especially supplements.

Now, After a few weeks with the combo I am having now, I can really tell that I’m finally getting a goodly amount of magnesium absorbed, but not too much that in the past has caused headaches. And while I am taking the magnesium mainly for muscle health (because of a problem I had in early 2015 that I concluded was because of magnesium deficiency but was much better after I started my first magnesium supplements), I think that my nerves are actually benefiting from it as well now. One way of telling is that when I shave, my skin feels more sensitive, which is probably a good thing. It may have been that because of still having a somewhat magnesium deficiency my nerves may have not been fully functioning. But I am only guessing here from my own experiences, or from my sensory or sensorial perceptions. (I could be all wet on this, though.)

By the way, speaking of the nerves and nerve health, I also learned over the years that too much vitamin B6 could cause numbing of the nerves. So I replaced my vitamin B-50, which has too much B6, with a different B-complex which has much lower B6.

Summary of Post on My Medical Ordeal with Bad Doctors and Prescription Drugs

My post on my ordeal with doctors, their bad advice and bad prescription drugs is not the easiest read ever. But if you have, or know someone who has, issues in the lower digestive area, then that post should be informative. One thing I maybe should have done was provide a summary of the post at the top and then be more specific throughout the rest of the post.

So, I will post this new summary here in this post, and add it as an update to that post.

  • It was an ordeal from 1999-2008. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC), or inflammatory bowel, with bleeding BMs.
  • Primary doctor advised that I eat whole wheat and bran to gain weight. (But people with UC shouldn’t eat whole wheat and bran which are irritants to the colon.)
  • Primary doctor had me have an upper GI series, in which the barium caused a return of pylorospasm (spastic pyloris) that caused further aggravation.
  • Prescription anti-inflammatory Asacol caused swelling in legs, feet and ankles, could hardly walk.
  • Switched to sulfasalazine. A colonoscopy doctor advised to increase sulfasalazine in 2001, and a different colonoscopy doctor advised in 2005 to increase it further. Based on an unusually high blood pressure reading at a physical, my research and conclusion were that the 2005-2006 increased sulfasalazine caused depletion of potassium which contributes to higher blood pressure. Reducing sulfasalazine resulted in lower, more normal blood pressure.
  • 2007-08 and onward I emphasized nutritional medicine and supplements. Were issues with fish oil/omega 3, and drinking Ensure for a long period. The biggest help since 2005 in my experience has been the acidophilus probiotic supplement.
  • 2008 colonoscopy the two GI doctors were “not sure” about “regenerative glands with neutrophils” and suggested another colonoscopy in just 6 months. My conclusion was that they were “FOS,” so I didn’t have that. Colonoscopies are very stressful! I had them in 2001, 2005, 2007, and 2008. There were polyps in 2001, but none in any of the subsequent colonoscopies. And I learned that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant that the colon tissue was healing after those initial years of inflammation.
  • In the lengthy post I also mention some of the foods I have, some of which have anti-inflammatory properties.

What I’ve Learned about Magnesium So Far

Not to be too obsessed with magnesium, but I wanted to list the things I have learned so far about magnesium and magnesium supplements. As I have stated here before, I can’t have most vegetables or nuts, which are important sources of magnesium. So, I have to take magnesium supplements to get my magnesium. But I have sure learned quite a bit now about these *$#@%&%@! supplements.

And here are some of those things:

  1. Magnesium is important for muscles, nerves and joints. That is why, if you can’t have vegetables or nuts, supplementing is a good idea.
  2. Some magnesium supplements contain magnesium oxide, which is not very bioavailable, and it is best for those who want to use magnesium as a laxative. (If a supplement product claims to be good for your muscles, nerves and joints, but its main ingredient is magnesium oxide, then I think they are being dishonest, and I call that product “cheap crap.”)
  3. Some supplements are sensitive to hot and humid weather. At least that was my conclusion last Summer with my magnesium citrate that was or seemed less effective. When it was less effective, it seems to be then acting more as a laxative. That’s been my own personal experience.
  4. Magnesium citrate and magnesium glycinate are quite bioavailable, although the glycinate is more so, and the citrate can be used as a laxative. There are other forms of magnesium in supplements that I haven’t had.
  5. Magnesium supplements can interact with other mineral or vitamin supplements. Too much supplemental magnesium can affect calcium and vitamin D levels (and maybe vice versa). There might also be a magnesium-iron interaction. I’m not sure, because some things have said to separate the magnesium from the iron and other things say to combine them. I take my first magnesium pill at breakfast with my zinc, and my 2nd magnesium at dinner. And I take my multivitamin that contains 100% daily iron with my mid-day meal. I did see that iron should be separated from vitamin E and zinc. Here is something from Labdoor, and something from ConsumerLab. Unfortunately, there is some conflicting information on the Internet.
  6. Too much magnesium being absorbed can cause dehydration and headaches. Especially if you are not used to taking magnesium supplements, in which case it is recommended to take a small amount at first (like one pill rather than two per day) and gradually increase it.
  7. Many magnesium supplements have been shown to be too high in arsenic and lead. Check them on Labdoor.com and ConsumerLab.com. But the label can indicate that it is probably safer. For example, “GMP” stands for “Good Manufacturing Practices,” and “USP” stands for “United States Pharmacopeia” that means it has passed actual tests for quality and purity, as I wrote here.
  8. And other magnesium supplements seem to contain other ingredients that you may not want, as I wrote here.

Follow-Up on Magnesium Supplements Post

Well, I feel that I have to write another post on magnesium supplements, as a follow-up on my previous post. Sorry if I’m sounding like a broken record.

I had been taking the Bluebonnet magnesium citrate but it seems to have been less effective again, so because, supposedly, magnesium glycinate is even more effective in absorption and bioavailability, I decided to give the glycinate a try again.

As I had written before, I had the KAL magnesium glycinate, but I didn’t like certain side effects, and the Labdoor review of that gave it a low grade for purity. So I have been taking the WFM 365 magnesium glycinate. But that’s causing some sort of side effects as well now, including having laxative effects, which I don’t want. It’s not supposed to do that.

The 365 magnesium glycinate has “GMP” on the label which means “Good Manufacturing Practices,” but it isn’t poof of passing any actual testing. However, if something has “USP” on the label then that stands for “United States Pharmacopeia,” and means it has passed actual tests for quality and purity. For example, the Nature Made magnesium citrate has that  “USP Dietary Supplement Verified” on its label.

The WFM 365 magnesium glycinate is 3 tablets per serving, that adds up to 400 mg of magnesium. So I assume that’s 133 mg per tablet. So, that compares to the KAL magnesium glycinate at only 2 tablets adding up to 400 mg of magnesium.

Hmmm, I guess with the 365 that’s like saying the equivalent of one of those 3 tablets is all filler? (i.e. those “other ingredients,” microcrystalline cellulose, stearic acid, hypromellose, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, and the notorious silicon dioxide.) Why is this?

So, I got a new bottle of the Bluebonnet magnesium citrate with a new expiration date (and it has been my experience that the newer date has been better). So I’ll be taking that again. And I might also try that Nature Made mentioned above that has “USP” on the label. I see online that the other Nature Made magnesium products do NOT have “USP” on the label, and Labdoor reviews two of those, both of which have a high grade for label accuracy and nutritional value, but a terrible, low grade for purity and safety. (However, for the Nature Made magnesium citrate, 2 softgels is one serving at 250 mg. It also contains “medium chain triglycerides.” That could have a negative effect on my digestive issues.)

But this is very frustrating, because I can’t have those important vegetables for magnesium for muscles, nerves, and joint health. I do have a baked potato for dinner without skin. I believe the insides of the potato is half soluble and half insoluble fiber, but it hasn’t been a problem. If only there were some other vegetable I could have that’s high in magnesium but low in insoluble fiber. I do get some magnesium from my beloved carrot juice, but not enough per day, though.

And I’m not going to order supplements online and have them delivered. I have to get it in a store. That’s my own self-imposed limitations and refusal to risk getting things online that I will be ingesting internally.

More Issues with Magnesium Supplements

I’ve written about my supplements here plenty of times now, especially magnesium. Just to summarize, because of my UC I can’t have most vegetables, so to get adequate amounts of magnesium, zinc, K2, etc, I take supplements.

Before 2015 I had been drinking Ensure, mainly for the extra calories. But Ensure contains vitamins and minerals as well. When I reduced the Ensure to just 1 (8 oz.) bottle per day in January 2015, I then started to have a muscle weakening issue, especially in the arms. So I learned that it was probably due to magnesium deficiency, and I concluded that it was because I was used to the magnesium that the Ensure provides (for a while I was taking 4 per day). At that time I got my first magnesium supplement. By late March it was getting a lot better.

However, at various times between 2016-18 I was having issues, and it may very well have been because perhaps the magnesium supplement wasn’t as good as it was initially, or the hot and humid weather was affecting the supplement.

Early last year I found the Bluebonnet magnesium citrate, which by April of last year it was working very well, and maybe even was too much. Supposedly magnesium citrate has a high bioavailability and absorption, as does magnesium glycinate. But I have also learned that the citrate isn’t as bioavailable as the glycinate and that the citrate can be used as a laxative. So it’s been my experience that if the magnesium citrate is not as effective for my muscles, coincidingly it has been having a somewhat more laxative effect, which I don’t want.

So most recently, I have been having issues again, and the magnesium citrate just doesn’t seem to be working as well as it was in April-May of last year. I DON’T want anything that’s going to act as a laxative!

So, I’m in the process of switching back to magnesium glycinate. A few times I had had the KAL magnesium glycinate, but there was something about it that seemed not right. Online the product testing agency Labdoor gave the KAL a low mark for purity and ingredient safety. At least the 365 brand of the magnesium glycinate has “GMP” on the label that other products don’t have. That stands for “Good Manufacturing Practice.”

Another issue is that I won’t order any of those kinds of supplements online or have something like that delivered here. I just don’t trust the safety of getting those kinds of things that way, so I’m limiting myself to what I’m able to find at various stores here.

My Ordeal With Doctors, Bad Advice, and Bad Prescription Drugs

UPDATE: Because this post is kind of a long read, I decided to add a summary of the important points at the top, and then continue with the actual post below the summary.

Here is the summary first:

  • It was an ordeal from 1999-2008. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC), or inflammatory bowel, with bleeding BMs.
  • Primary doctor advised that I eat whole wheat and bran to gain weight. (But people with UC shouldn’t eat whole wheat and bran which are irritants to the colon.)
  • Primary doctor had me have an upper GI series, in which the barium caused a return of pylorospasm (spastic pyloris) that caused further aggravation.
  • Prescription anti-inflammatory Asacol caused swelling in legs, feet and ankles, could hardly walk.
  • Switched to sulfasalazine. A colonoscopy doctor advised to increase sulfasalazine in 2001, and a different colonoscopy doctor advised in 2005 to increase it further. Based on an unusually high blood pressure reading at a physical, my research and conclusion were that the 2005-2006 increased sulfasalazine caused depletion of potassium which contributes to higher blood pressure. Reducing sulfasalazine resulted in lower, more normal blood pressure.
  • 2007-08 and onward I emphasized nutritional medicine and supplements. Were issues with fish oil/omega 3, and drinking Ensure for a long period. The biggest help since 2005 in my experience has been the acidophilus probiotic supplement.
  • 2008 colonoscopy the two GI doctors were “not sure” about “regenerative glands with neutrophils” and suggested another colonoscopy in just 6 months. My conclusion was that they were “FOS,” so I didn’t have that. Colonoscopies are very stressful! I had them in 2001, 2005, 2007, and 2008. There were polyps in 2001, but none in any of the subsequent colonoscopies. And I learned that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant that the colon tissue was healing after those initial years of inflammation.
  • In this post I also mention some of the foods I have, some of which have anti-inflammatory properties.

Now, here is the actual post on my ordeal that went on for years:

I wanted to write a chronicle of my 1999-2008 medical ordeal with the ulcerative colitis (UC), and with the doctors, the doctors’ bad advice and prescription drugs that either made things worse again or caused new problems.

So, here it is.

My ordeal began during the 1999-2000 period. It was better by April 2000, but there were relapses between 2001-2005. It was under control from 2005 until 2012 when there was an unexpected relapse. (If there is bleeding with BMs I call that a “relapse” of inflammation.)

The UC condition has been better since 2013. But it is still a sensitive condition. And I can’t eat a lot of foods/drinks, especially most vegetables, so I have to have various supplements such as magnesium, zinc, vitamin K and K2, etc., as I have mentioned before. I did go through a lot of “trial and error” with foods at times between 2000 and the later 2000s. But I never have foods now that could aggravate things (not knowingly, anyway). And I have foods that actually have anti-inflammatory properties.

To begin, in September and October 1999 there were about 10-15 times to the bathroom per day, and with bleeding. The bleeding was probably stimulating the extra BMs. The primary doctor during that period indicated that I had had a low blood count, low protein level, and my weight was in the range of 117-125. (I am approx. 6 feet.)

In September 1999 the proctologist doctor did a “flexible sigmoidoscopy,” diagnosed the UC and prescribed Rowasa enema. Things got better by mid-November and December of 1999.

However, the primary doctor was concerned about my continued low weight, and he suggested I add more calories to gain weight.

The primary doctor suggested I eat bran and whole wheat. At that time I was unaware that bran and whole wheat are irritants to the colon, even with people with normal digestive systems, so I did what was suggested. And by January 2000 the colitis was worse again.

But I didn’t see the relationship between my eating bran and whole wheat and the worsening UC relapse, and continued eating bran and whole wheat. I was also going back to eating normally perhaps a bit too soon. (Perhaps the doctor should have known not to suggest bran and whole wheat to a colitis sufferer?)

Another thing at that time in the primary doctor’s concern over my continued low weight was that he wanted me to have an upper GI series, because he thought there might have been something else going on. So I had a GI series, and I believe that the GI series barium reaggravated a “pylorospasm” (spastic pylorus) that I had during the mid-1980s that interfered with food digestion. The spastic pylorus continued to compound the relapsed colitis symptoms from January through March of 2000.

And so in January 2000 with the UC worse again, with multiple BMs per day and bleeding, this time I was having trouble retaining the Rowasa enema. And then the proctologist gave me Asacol, an oral tablet, which was supposed to be a timed release kind of thing, to prevent systemic absorption.

But apparently not. My side effects of that Asacol included swelling in the lower legs, feet and ankles. At one point, I could hardly walk. And there was also swelling in the scrotum. So the proctologist doctor switched me to sulfasalazine oral tablet (I think the timed release version) combined with Cortifoam, another rectal drug.

Regarding the lower legs/feet/ankle swelling, one of my parents suggested I try compression socks that go up to just below the knee. The swelling almost disappeared by the next day after putting on those socks. But did any doctor suggest the compression socks? Nope.

And so during this time of March 2000 I was also trying to be more conscientious with my eating habits, now that I was a little more informed about the relationship between foods and these digestive issues. My mother suggested Ensure to give me more calories and protein to help me to gain more weight. Of course, none of the doctors suggested that.

Also at that time I was taking Xanax, and I am way against those kinds of things. But I needed something to help me through this whole time that was going on for months now. It was extremely stressful. So with that anti-anxiety drug, the sulfasalazine and drinking Ensure, by April 2000 the condition and symptoms were a lot better (again), and the bleeding was gone.

I continued with the sulfasalazine as an ongoing daily medication. The weight got up to the mid-130s and stayed there maybe for a few years (now it’s about 140-142).

After an August 2001 colonoscopy, that colonoscopy doctor said there was still inflammation in the colon/rectum, so he advised that I go from 1 sulfasalazine tablet 4 times per day to 2 tablets 4 times per day. So I did that. He didn’t ask about or mention anything about foods or suggest any changes in my diet.

There had been bleeding-BM relapses that lasted about 4-5 months each, in 2001, 2002, 2003, and December 2004-April 2005.

In 2004 and 2005 I learned more about “natural anti-inflammatories.” I began taking fish oil softgels around April of 2005 because I learned that they are high in omega 3, which has anti-inflammatory properties. And in late 2005 I began taking acidophilus probiotic pills.

However, just to digress a bit, by about 10 years later I learned that it may not be a good idea to take fish oil or omega 3 supplements in the long term, like more than a year. (For example, see this article.) So I gradually reduced and then eliminated the fish oil softgels and tried to just eat fish, which was recommended. However, the fish was a problem with my sensitive digestive condition. I tried different kinds of fish, and cooking it or fish in a can such as sardines. Alas, it appears that fish causes my digestive system trouble, for some reason.

So as a natural omega 3 alternative to fish, I’ve been getting the cage-free eggs that all say a minimum of 70 mg of omega 3 per egg. Or brands that say it has over 100 mg per egg.

As far as keeping inflammation low or preventing it in the lower digestive area, the acidophilus is most important, as far as I’m concerned. But as I have written quite a bit now on my blog, having foods that have anti-inflammatory properties (such as extra virgin olive oil) is helpful, and not having any kinds of foods that could be pro-inflammatory is helpful (or necessary, in my case). No junk food or processed foods, no insoluble fiber, nuts, etc.

At the August 2005 colonoscopy, the new colonoscopy doctor told me to increase from 2 to 3 sulfasalazine tablets 4 times per day. He said nothing about foods or nutritional supplements at that time. So I increased the sulfasalazine and continued that over the next year.

However, later in 2006 at my annual physical examination, the new primary doctor said my blood pressure was unusually high. It had been on the low side for decades, according to previous doctors. So after some investigation on the Internet, I learned that one possible side effect of sulfasalazine is that it could affect your potassium level. And a low potassium level can cause or contribute to high blood pressure.

So I reduced the sulfasalazine, and the blood pressure went back down to more normal levels. (But now when I check that on the Internet 12 years later, there are no articles mentioning the relationship between sulfasalazine and potassium, as I saw then. Why is this?)

And by the way, regarding sulfasalazine, besides its possibly contributing to reducing potassium level, it also could cause a depletion of folic acid. And folic acid is something that’s very important for colon health! So two different colonoscopy doctors both told me to increase sulfasalazine but did not tell me to make sure I supplement with folic acid! They MUST know about sulfasalazine’s effect on folic acid! So that one bothers me, too. How could they not know that?

My 2007 colonoscopy, by the way, showed a reduction in inflammation, despite my discontinuing anti-inflammatory prescription drugs earlier that year and concentrating on nutritional supplements.

I “discovered” the acidophilus/probiotic supplement in late 2005, and began taking those at that time. I didn’t have any relapses with bleeding between about April 2005 and November 2012, and I attribute that in large part to taking the acidophilus supplement.

In November-December 2012 there was a relapse with bleeding for the first time in 7 years. By early 2013 I realized that the acidophilus I was taking wasn’t as good as it was in the first several years of taking it. The reviews of that particular product on Amazon seemed to confirm my suspicion. So in 2013 I switched to a different acidophilus product. And things have been much better since then.

At my 2007 colonoscopy I told the doctor (not the earlier GI doctor from 1999-2001 but the new one from 2005) about the acidophilus and how that seemed to make things a lot better since two years prior to that. And he said that he was a “big fan” of acidophilus. So I was wondering why, in the previous colonoscopy, he didn’t tell me about the acidophilus/probiotic supplements.

And why didn’t any of my primary doctors tell me during those years?

That colonoscopy doctor did, however, try to push the prescription anti-inflammatory Asacol on me at that time. That was the drug I had in early 2000 that caused swelling in the legs, etc.

Besides trying to push Asacol on me, in the examination room he had coffee mugs with the name “Asacol” on them, and his clipboard he was using had “Asacol” on the top! So this was quite a learning experience. And he was the head of endoscopy/colonoscopy at a major metropolitan hospital at that time!

And then after the 2008 colonoscopy, that same colonoscopy doctor advised that I see another specialist because of some issue with that colonoscopy that the doctor didn’t explain. So I saw that so-called specialist who said that that particular colonoscopy biopsy showed “markedly regenerative glands with neutrophils,” but “indefinite for dysplasia.” The specialist wanted me to go have another colonoscopy in just 6 months!

I asked that “specialist” GI doctor to further clarify the issue. And he said something along the lines that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant either that the colon tissue had been “regenerating” (a good thing), or that it was a sign that there were cells developing that could show “dysplasia” (or possibly cancer cells).

Well, my own conclusion was that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant that the colon was really healing after those earlier years of inflammation, bleeding, etc., and that it was not a sign of developing cancer.

And so given how stressful those colonoscopies were for me (including the day-before prep!) I decided to take the chance and not go in for that next requested colonoscopy. I concluded at that time that those doctors were just full of it and that they wanted to make the hospital more money, quite frankly. (And see this.)

By the way, I have not had another colonoscopy since 2008, thank God. And, incidentally, while the 2001 colonoscopy had “old, dried out polyps,” according to that first colonoscopy doctor, my 2005, 2007, and 2008 colonoscopies all showed NO polyps. (Humph! to them for putting me through all this crap, for years, and for no good reason!)

Now, back to my own nutritional treatments. So in the 2007-08 time I continued with acidophilus, fish oil softgels, quercetin (an antioxidant  bioflavonoid), vitamin D, guar gum for soluble fiber, and folic acid, mainly.

As I wrote on my blog, regarding drinking Ensure, it’s probably not a good idea to have that in the long term either. Ensure is high in sugar and has corn oil and corn maltodextrin, as well as a lot of synthetic “vitamin” and mineral ingredients. I started that around March of 2000. In September 2013 I began to gradually decrease that from four 8-oz bottles per day to 3, and then 2, and 1, and my last bottle of Ensure was in June of 2016.

I gradually decreased the fish oil from about early 2014 and stopped that by around March of 2016.

And I’m not saying that my colon is all better, not at all. It’s still a very sensitive condition, and I can’t eat a lot of things, as I mentioned at the top.

Starting in September 2013 I added hard-boiled eggs to my daily diet. In 2014 I added extra-virgin olive oil and carrot juice (100% juice, no fiber). And (I think by 2015 or ’16) I added concord grape juice. And I also have apple juice. It’s 2 servings per day of each of those three juices, which I don’t believe should be a problem (as far as carbohydrates or sugars are concerned, but I could be wrong).

And I also switched from margarine to organic butter. Butter and whole milk contain milk fat, which I had read has anti-inflammatory properties, especially for the digestive system.

An additional thing that I have is whey protein. I know that it’s not a good idea to have too much protein per day, not more than 200 grams, I think. But I don’t have that much. The main reason for the whey protein is that it contains natural amino acids and L-glutamine, which have been shown to repair damaged colon tissue (e.g. damaged from inflammation). And I refuse to take any of those prescription anti-inflammatories, unless I really, really have to.

But I had to learn about all those nutritional factors, for colon support and to help prevent any further ulcerative colitis, from the Internet, not from doctors. And I do extensive research on everything, such as checking multiple sources.

So I didn’t learn one thing about nutrition from any “doctor.” It was quite the opposite, in my view. Doctors were mostly pushing their damn prescription drugs, as well as giving harmful advice, or withholding information.

And that’s been my general experience, especially with this ordeal since 1999. I really believe that my lower digestive condition right now wouldn’t be this sensitive, and that I probably would still be able to have more foods including some vegetables had the first doctor in 1999 not given me bad advice and had I been informed much earlier of the effects of diet, and had I known about the probiotic supplements earlier. I don’t believe that I would have had those relapses (that may have had a cumulative weakening effect on the colon) from 2001-2005 and in 2012.

Some of My Issues With Dietary Supplements

Several times here I have mentioned my issues with some dietary supplements (as well as the prescription drugs). Because I can’t have certain foods especially most vegetables, because of my digestive condition (UC), I have to have certain supplements.

Magnesium is important for muscles, nerves and joints. However, it has been difficult and frustrating having a magnesium supplement that is bioavailable and that absorbs into the system, and doesn’t act as a laxative! Magnesium oxide is one of those forms of magnesium that acts as a laxative, so I don’t want that. Magnesium citrate and magnesium glycinate are the two forms that I’ve had that are best to absorb.

So here are some of the problems with magnesium supplements (some of which I have already mentioned here). In 2015 after having reduced the Ensure down to 1 per day, I was having problems with my muscles mainly in the arms. And I saw online that it could be magnesium deficiency. I think the Ensure that I was used to has magnesium as well as other minerals and vitamins. Well, the situation got a lot better after starting the magnesium citrate. In 2015-2017 I was getting the Vitamin World magnesium citrate. But in later 2017 my Vitamin World store closed down, so I had to find a different supplement. That was a very difficult process. I finally found the Bluebonnet magnesium citrate after having tried the KAL magnesium glycinate. There was something wrong with that KAL and I saw online that it got low marks in the purity category.

So while the Bluebonnet is (or was) good, I still have had some problems with these supplements, such as last Summer that was very hot and humid. And I learned that hot and humid weather can affect supplements. And there are other factors involved. And in the past month I am beginning to wonder if the Bluebonnet may not be as good now as it was last year. So this is frustrating. (I wish I could just eat broccoli and asparagus and all that stuff, but I can’t.)

And then there are other issues with supplements, such as containing other ingredients that cause problems. There’s no reason why, for example, Solaray’s “BioCitrate Magnesium” has to have “watercress leaf,” “dandelion root,” “alfalfa leaf,” and “parsley leaf.” Do they put that stuff in there just to be cool?

I wonder how many people take these supplements specifically because they have trouble digesting important vegetables? And other ingredients that might be harsh to digest. Do the supplement makers understand these things?

Why does Whole Foods 365 chelated zinc have to contain rice flour? I looked online and, while I know that rice is mostly (if not all) insoluble fiber, a cup of rice flour still contains not that much insoluble fiber. So there should only be a teeny-tiny amount of the fiber in one of these zinc pills. Right? I still had a problem with it. So I’ve been getting the Jarrow Formulas zinc, but I’m not totally pleased with it.

And why does Nature Made magnesium citrate have to contain “medium chain triglycerides”? I haven’t had it, but online sources state that medium chain triglycerides could cause gastric distress, something obviously someone like me doesn’t need. And it could also cause liver issues.

I also have been consuming whey protein for quite a few years. Whey contains natural amino acids and L-glutamine, which have been shown to repair damaged colon tissue (damaged, in my case, from inflammation), as well as aid in general muscle tissue replacement. Which is why body-builders use whey protein. However, many of those supplements contain a lot of extra ingredients that aren’t particularly good or healthy, such as artificial sweeteners, preservatives, etc. It is difficult for me to find a good product that’s reliable in my stores. And I don’t want to order these kinds of things online. I was getting one product at Trader Joe’s but they haven’t had it for a few months, so I have to get it at Whole Foods, at $15 more than I was getting it for at Trader Joe’s. Frustrating. A similar product, the same brand but a different variety (and with ingredients I don’t particularly want) is available at GNC.

So magnesium, zinc and vitamin K2 are especially important, and I have to have these supplements. That’s the way it is.

“Relief Factor” and Omega 3

From time to time I hear some talk radio personalities advertising for “Relief Factor,” an anti-inflammatory dietary supplement. Each “Relief Factor” packet contains 2 fish oil softgels and 2 capsules containing Epimedium (200 mg), Turmeric (667 mg), and Japanese Fleeceflower (70 mg).

The “Relief Factor” website suggests taking three packets per day to start and then reduce it to two per day. The 2 fish oil softgels together contain 1400 mg of fish oil that includes 900 mg of omega 3. That means that each individual softgel contains 700 mg fish oil and 450 mg omega 3 (2 softgels = one serving).

Now, if you take three packets per day of 2 fish oil softgels each, that amounts to 2700 mg of just omega 3 per day (as well as whatever else is in the fish oil). Yikes! that’s too damn much omega 3 per day!

We’re not talking about “3 grams of fish oil,” because oftentimes fish oil softgels (such as 1200 mg each) only contain 300-500 mg of omega 3, and the rest of the fish oil softgel contains omega 6 and other things. No, we’re talking nearly 3 grams of just omega 3!

I have touched on fish oil a bit here and will mention that again in my upcoming post on my medical ordeal, the post that’s almost finished.

So, there are two issues that I have learned about regarding omega 3. The first issue is that it could have a blood-thinning effect, and could interact with prescription blood-thinners. So, while the supplement makers don’t mention this, it is probably a good idea for fish oil (or otherwise omega 3-containing supplements) consumers to not take blood thinners. Or, if someone is taking a blood thinner for some reason (like coumadin, for example), then it would be a good idea to not take too much omega 3 or a supplement that is high in omega 3.

Now, that’s the first issue with omega 3. The second issue is that (and I may have mentioned this on this blog) it may not be a good idea to be taking fish oil or omega 3 supplements in the long term, and that just eating fish as a part of the diet would be healthier. I am going to mention that again in my upcoming post on my medical ordeal from the 2000s. Here is another article I found on that issue.

It is best to get dietary omega 3 from natural food sources, in my view, such as fish, krill, seeds and nuts. It can also be found in milk, chicken, beef and eggs. Because of my digestive issues, I have been relying on eggs for omega 3. But there are other foods to have that could have anti-inflammatory effects. It is also a good idea to avoid foods that have a pro-inflammatory effect, like foods containing corn oil.

But, as far as fish oil supplements such as “Relief Factor,” perhaps taking that when one has had an injury or to otherwise address some specific issue, temporarily, could be a good idea.

Soluble Fiber Good, Insoluble Fiber Not So Much

There is a somewhat recent post on fiber by Mark Sisson, who is known for his “primal blueprint.” It is quite informative. I’m glad that at some point he notes the difference between soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Insoluble fiber is also referred to as “roughage” and doesn’t dissolve in water and isn’t digestible. If someone such as myself has issues in the colon then avoiding insoluble fiber is advised.

Insoluble fiber is found in many vegetables, fruits, nuts and grains.

Back in 2004 or so I was reading about fiber and how it could be helpful for someone with inflammatory bowel a.k.a. ulcerative colitis. But at that time I hadn’t learned enough about it. I was having pea soup for a while, but when I had another relapse of colitis in late 2004 I looked into these things further.

But it is okay for a sensitive colon to ingest soluble fiber, which does dissolve in water and is digestible. But not too much of it.

And even some forms of soluble fiber are still “harsh” and a bit difficult to digest, as I have found out. One example, in my experience, was pectin. The acidophilus pearls that I was having from 2005-2013 seemed to add pectin to their ingredients and I wasn’t aware of it until I then had a relapse in late 2012 the first one since 2005. In 2013 I switched to a different brand of acidophilus supplement.

Another harsh form of soluble fiber is fructooligosaccharide (FOS), which Ensure Plus had added and which seemed to give me a bit of trouble (when I was drinking Ensure, that is). Ensure removed the FOS at some point. I’ll bet people complained about it. One thing Ensure is good for is for people who have big issues in their digestive system and can’t eat a lot of food at that time, especially someone with ulcerative colitis.

But I had read that soluble fiber is good for the colon and actually aids the acidophilus probiotics to do what they’re supposed to do. So for several years I have been having a half-teaspoon of guar gum powder 3 times a day, mixed in with my apple juice or grape juice.