Category Archives: Colitis

Recent Kawasaki Disease-Like Inflammatory Condition in the News

You may have heard about the children recently who have been suffering from some sort of inflammatory issues, in which the condition has been compared to Kawasaki disease and toxic shock syndrome. The children have also suffered from multisystem organ failure. Well, it appears that some of the same suspects who have been exaggerating the seriousness of COVID-19 and participating in falsely inflating the COVID death numbers, and engaging in panic and fear-mongering, have been trying to tie those children’s inflammatory conditions to COVID-19.

There is a terrific article on the Children’s Health Defense website which goes into all the aspects of this so-far unexplained children’s inflammatory phenomenon. The article discusses Kawasaki disease and the possibility of vaccines being associated with that, and asks some important questions, including these that particularly interested me:

3. Did the children have any recent exposure to environmental toxins, including but not limited to mercury? A study of KD just published in northern Italy—the same highly air-polluted region heavily affected by COVID-19—reported a strong correlation between “the frequency of KD onsets and environmental factors,” including air pollutants; the study’s methodology did not permit the investigators to pinpoint which particulates might be responsible. U.S.-based studies have likewise linked KD to airborne environmental triggers. Could the same hold true for the “Kawasaki-like” illness being attributed to COVID-19?

4. What kinds of toxins might children be overexposed to while cooped up at home without “fresh air or sunlight”? Given that KD and toxic shock syndrome have both been linked to toxins, this is a question that warrants answers.

5. Is anyone assessing affected children’s recent vaccination history? As the large body of research linking KD and vaccines suggests, a child’s vaccination experiences—such as the timing of prior vaccination, the specific vaccines administered, whether the child received multiple vaccines all at once, and whether they received thimerosal-containing vaccines such as influenza vaccines—can provide important clues. Examining children’s prior (and possibly recent) influenza vaccine history is particularly pertinent because a 2018 CDC-supported study found an increased risk of acute respiratory illness (non-influenza) in influenza-vaccinated children compared to children who had not received a flu vaccine. In adults, a study published by the U.S. military in early 2020 also highlighted this issue, showing that soldiers who had received an influenza vaccine had a 36% increased risk of subsequent coronavirus infection. As studies are also proving that unvaccinated children are healthier, perhaps we should also be asking whether any KD or “PIMS” even occurs in unvaccinated children.

6. Could components of vaccines be functioning as superantigens, triggering “an unusual degree of immune activation”? Scientists who have studied the “distinctive immune system characteristics” of children with KD acknowledge that the “antigenic stimulation” set in motion by vaccines and other biologics has the capacity to create “immunologic interference.”

On Trusting the Word of the “Authorities”

You would think that in today’s day and age more people would question the “wisdom” of establishment medicine and the pharmaceutical industry. But that does not seem to be the case. Many people don’t want to see the connection between pharmaceutical drugs or vaccines and illnesses or conditions. They don’t want to question the vaccines and the potential of vaccines causing some kind of neurological harm.

We don’t want to question our doctors for some reason. And when it comes to the autism phenomenon, the whole debate regarding the vaccines gets shut down by the vaccines’ defenders, criticizing the opponents as “anti-vaxxers,” and asserting that the vaccine-autism connection has been “debunked.” It’s “settled science,” and all that. Which it isn’t, “settled science.”

If you don’t look into it, as Sharyl Attkinson has done, and if you just blindly trust the medical establishment and its mainstream media spokespeople, then of course you’ll not want to hear the arguments by informed vaccine skeptics.

And regarding the vaccines, with all the adjuvants, mercury and aluminum and so on. Not only the vaccines themselves that are given to children whose brains are still in the important developmental stages, but the number of vaccines they are given, the combinations of different vaccines at the same time, and the big increase in the number of doses given to a child just in the first 5 or 6 years of life. 60 doses?

And that combined with what the medical establishment and the schools are doing to the kids now, misdiagnosing the kids with not just autism, but ADHD, ADD, even depression and anxiety, when in many cases the kids are just acting like normal kids!

So no wonder the young people now such as the ones of college age are showing a big increase in anxiety and depression, they are so easily “triggered” by the littlest thing, they need “safe spaces,” teddy bears and puppy dogs to comfort them. No wonder they are hysterical, thinking that the end is near, “the world will end in 12 years,” as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez ignorantly warns.

And no wonder the college campuses are experiencing irrational protests against nothing that matters in the real world, invasions and hostage-takings of Dean’s offices, shouting down of ideological opponents, censorship and banning of speakers. What is really causing these kids to act this way, this hysterical and irrational way? (Although, it’s not just the students, the faculties of these places of “education” are also filled with irrationality.)

So, in my view, burying their heads in the sand is what the deniers of vaccine- and drug-damage do in their defense of so much propaganda by the medical establishment, government and their media stenographers.

So now as with most of the “pandemic” scares there is a race to develop and distribute a new coronavirus vaccine to the masses, regardless of whether its been tested or approved. This is all based on panic and hysteria, of course.

Jon Rappoport has some recent posts on the China “epidemic.” Here is his summary of the ongoing crisis. He appears to believe that it is extremely difficult to prove that the so-called coronoavirus outbreak was caused by a “bio-weapon” accident or intentional release, and suggests that “published genetic sequences could be con jobs, hustles, and giant errors.”

Rappoport refers to “contaminated water supplies; lack of basic sanitation; giant toxic agricultural farms; industrial poison-pollution; hunger; starvation; protein-calorie malnutrition; fertile farm land stolen from native people by corporations and governments; toxic medical drugs and vaccines; and now, in Wuhan and other Chinese cities, unprecedented mixtures of toxic air pollution, causing lung damage.” And he refers to virus “propaganda,” which would be no surprise to me.

Rappoport writes:

I raise one more question for your serious consideration. If highly toxic pollution in the air, in Chinese cities, is causing deep lung damage, and if the Chinese government is covering that up with a story about a virus—what is now happening to the millions of Chinese people locked down, with nowhere to go, trapped in those cities—breathing the air?

And in this more recent post, Rappoprt discusses how the numbers of people testing positive for the coronavirus can be greatly inflated, and that a more likely situation is people having pneumonia, especially given China’s very high pollution levels and the negative effects on the respiratory systems of many Chinese people.

But when it comes to the medical industry and its enmeshment with (and collusions with) governments, for some reason most people seem to take the word of the industry leaders and government leaders as well.

But from my own personal experiences, I have seen up close the dishonesty and corruption with doctors, as I had detailed in my post on my own medical ordeal from the late 1990s to the late 2000s. For instance, with that ulcerative colitis medical ordeal, one doctor told me to eat more “bran and whole wheat” to gain more weight, yet people with ulcerative colitis shouldn’t have such foods that are irritants to the colon. I learned the hard way. And another doctor telling me to increase the sulfasalazine anti-inflammatory drug, which, I later learned (the hard way), depletes our potassium levels as well as our folic acid. The decreased potassium level caused my blood pressure to go up, and when I then decreased the sulfasalazine the blood pressure went back down to normal. Those were just a few instances of bad advice from the “experts” with MDs.

And my now-late father, who had Alzheimer’s. He had been given Lipitor and then later on had two strokes in 2013, at which time his arterial blockage was discovered. More recently I learned that statin drugs have been shown to deplete our vitamin K2, as well as our CoQ10. Vitamin K2 is important for efficient calcium distribution. K2 makes sure that our calcium that we consume is distributed to our bones where we need it, and it prevents calcium maldistribution, making sure that our calcium does not get stored where we don’t want it — our arteries, heart, etc. If the calcium builds up in those areas, known as calcifications, then it can cause  a blockage, such as in the artery and that would prevent important nutrients from passing through the bloodstream to get to the brain effectively, which will cause cognitive problems such as with one’s memory.

So my father’s Alzheimer’s following his two strokes and his further decline for the next 6 years (that I believe was started by his statin drug Lipitor) was another learning experience in addition to my own experiences. (By the way, Joe Biden takes a statin drug. I just thought I’d throw that out there.)

Bottom line: I don’t trust the word of medical “authorities” (and certainly not government authorities!), and I check things out with my own research, on the Internet, and learn from my own experiences.

Autism and Inflammation

An article at Health Impact News, which I very much recommend, discusses some recent studies which show a link between brain inflammation and autism. A Tufts University study calls inflammation the “main driver behind autism,” and a Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center study found “evidence suggesting that an immune response targeting specialized cells in the brain resulted in chronic inflammation in two thirds of autistic brains analyzed postmortem,” according to Health Impact News.

The article points out other past studies showing a linkage between brain inflammation and autism. It also pointed to another study showing a linkage between intestinal inflammation and autism as well. The article notes that “67 percent (of children diagnosed with autism) more likely to be diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than their peers (not diagnosed with autism).”

The prevalence of autism diagnoses in children seems to have skyrocketed between 1980 and 2002, and especially since 2002.

Now, some particular contributors to brain inflammation and autism, as noted by the article, have been vaccines. Children are being given too many vaccine shots at too young an age.

And based on my own experiences and research, I would say that there are other contributors to inflammation as well.

Stress is a large contributor to inflammation, as shown in this article. And it shouldn’t be too much of a surprise that some children might have symptoms as a result of inflammation, because many children have a lot of emotional stress in their lives, especially those who are abused, molested, or neglected in the home.

Also, since the September 11th terrorist attacks of 2001, also known as 9/11, little children have been further stressed and terrorized by constant government pronouncements that “the terrorists are out to get us,” as repeated in the news media. The kids also are now exposed to totally unnecessary terrorism drills in the schools, and traveling children have been the victims of abuse, molesting and groping by TSA agents.

I don’t know how many photos or videos I have seen online or articles I’ve read regarding the crying little kids being criminally molested by the airport gestapo who believe that every little kid (and Grandma) is a terror suspect and anal cavity searches are in order. It’s sick.

Besides the TSA gestapo, the exaggerated terror threat and invasive “security” procedures that George W. Bush and Dick Cheney have caused and Obama and Trump have continued to authorize, today’s children are also having to deal with stressful situations in their own families. They have to deal with a mommy who is too distracted with her precious iPhone and texting while ignoring and neglecting her kid, or a daddy who is too preoccupied with his Internet porn, and so on.

So besides the parents too glued to their electronics, the kids themselves are spending too much time on their own devices, staring into screens all day, and that causes emotional stress as well. According to Psychology Today, kids spending too much time staring into their screens causes more stress and problems with sleep and mood, and actually can impede brain development in children.

So I can see how such stresses in a child’s life, certainly more than I had to deal with when I was growing up in the 1960s and ’70s, can contribute to inflammation.

Besides stress, there are other causes of inflammation. According to this 2018 Healthline article, sugar, sugary foods and high fructose corn syrup have been shown to cause more inflammation. But you probably already knew that. “In one study, mice fed high-sucrose diets developed breast cancer that spread to their lungs — in part due to the inflammatory response to sugar,” notes the Healthline article. And, “In another study, the anti-inflammatory impact of omega-3 fatty acids was impaired in mice fed a high-sugar diet.”

Hmm, that explains, at least in part, the ulcerative colitis (inflammation of the colon) relapses I continued to have during the years that I drank Ensure, which is high in sugar, as I wrote in my post on my medical ordeal.

Also in the Healthline article, besides the sugar and high fructose corn syrup, other food related contributors to inflammation include artificial trans fats (as distinguished from natural trans fats found in dairy and meats), vegetable and seed oils (many of which are high in omega 6), refined carbohydrates (“found in candy, bread, pasta, pastries, some cereals, cookies, cakes, sugary soft drinks and all processed food that contains added sugar or flour”), excessive alcohol and processed meat.

I remember as a kid and even into my 20s eating those processed lunch meats. No wonder I had such problems. And I also ate a lot of junk food sweets. I can see the linkage of those products and probable inflammation, and the emotional and behavioral issues I had, as well as the ulcerative colitis I developed later on. I don’t want to say that I had actual “autism” as a kid. But I can say, given my years and experiences with ulcerative colitis, that I had “inflammation.”

Perhaps doctors can look more closely at possible diagnoses of inflammation in kids. People can prevent inflammation, not only by trying to reduce stress and eating foods that are known to have anti-inflammatory properties, but by not eating foods (mentioned above) that are known to cause inflammation.

Avoiding spending too much time staring into your electronics and screens can’t hurt either.

And I know I’ve thrown a lot of ideas into this one post, but it’s important to make connections, such as between autism and inflammation, and the causes of inflammation.

Regarding My Post on My Medical Ordeal

I’ve been wanting to blog here more regularly but either I just don’t have enough time to do this or I have what is sometimes known as “writer’s block.”

One essay that I did spend a lot of time on was my detailed post on my years-long ordeal with my ulcerative colitis, the doctors’ bad advice and bad prescription drugs, and/or the corrupt and dishonest doctors I had to deal with. I had emailed that post to several people including some non-Establishment medical doctors and people who run alternative medicine websites.

Maybe I didn’t do as good a job as I thought on the post, I don’t know. But I did spend a lot of time on it, over a period of months, and didn’t post it until I was sure it was good enough. So I haven’t gotten any feedback on it, so far. Maybe readers can check it out if you hadn’t seen it. Perhaps it could use a re-write? I hope not. At some subsequent point, I did add a summary of the ordeal at the top of the post.

Update on Olive Oil and Omega 3 and 6

I know I’ve posted several blogs on olive oil and fish recently, but here is another one of my posts in which I go over my own experiences with nutritional issues and some of the things I have learned.

Now, I am just an amateur at all this, which is one reason why I have had to change my diet several times over the years. I learn something new or something more accurate about the foods or supplements I have been having.

So after seeing the article on olive oil by Mark Sisson that I linked to previously, I have looked into the issue more and now I’ve concluded that maybe I had been consuming too much olive oil. (Yes, I guess you can have too much.)

Since maybe 2016 I have been having 6 tablespoons per day of extra virgin olive oil. The reason why I increased it at that time was because I had been drinking Ensure like four 8 oz. bottles per day since the year 2000, and I gradually ended that starting in September 2013 until the final one in June 2016.

The reason for the Ensure was mainly to get “healthy” calories, which it gave me, as well as some nutrition because I have my sensitive digestive condition ulcerative colitis and can’t eat most vegetables and other foods. But I realized that it’s not a good idea to have Ensure regularly in the long term.

To go with ending the Ensure I did several things to make up for what I had been used to for those years. I added the carrot juice and grape juice, as well as magnesium and zinc supplements, and increased the extra virgin olive oil.

I looked into olive oil at that time and it seemed like it would be okay to have that many 1-tablespoon servings per day. However, now that I’ve looked into it again, I am seeing that it’s probably not a good idea to do that, mainly because olive oil’s omega 6 (which is pro-inflammatory) content is quite high and its omega 3 (anti-inflammatory) is quite low in comparison.

So I am someone who already has inflammatory issues and it might not be a good idea to be getting what very well might be too much omega 6 (which I believe Ensure probably has, by the way, because of its use of corn oil which is way high in omega 6, and canola oil which is also higher in omega 6 than omega 3).

Apparently, there needs to be the right ratio of omega 6 to omega 3. Some say it should be 4:1 and some say it should be 1:1. In modern heart-diseased Western society, the ratio has been way out of whack, like 20:1 or worse, because of the way processed foods are produced using the “bad” vegetable oils, such as corn oil and soybean oil. Supposedly that has changed the content of the livestock feed and thus the “fatty acid profile” of our meats, according to Chris Kresser (and see another recent article of his I found informative).

So at the same time that I have reduced the extra virgin olive oil from 6 to 4 tablespoon servings per day (for now), I have increased my fish consumption, in order to increase my omega 3 per day. My eggs which say they contain a higher amount of omega 3 are not reliable.

I know that I mentioned here before that besides the Ensure I was also taking fish oil softgels for about 10 years and learned that that might not be a good idea in the long term either. And I tried switching to just eating fish, but it seemed that my sensitive digestive issues had a problem with the fish, so I then relied on the omega 3-enhanced eggs. But now for the past few weeks I have been eating the fish again and so far it doesn’t seem to be causing a problem. And that’s the canned sardines just 1/2 of a can every other day is what I’m doing now. (Unfortunately, the canned sardines are very expensive, but that’s the way it is now.)

A reason that I was having the extra virgin olive oil (after ending the Ensure) was to make sure that I get enough calories and fats per day. I’m sure (or I hope) that reducing the extra virgin olive oil while increasing the fish shouldn’t cause me to have inadequate calories per day. But this is getting a little frustrating though.

UPDATE: Now it’s 9/18/19, and I have reduced the extra virgin olive oil to 3 1-tbsp servings per day, and I’ll stick with that. And I may have mentioned this before, but I’ve been having a 1/2 can of sardines every other day. (But it’s a little expensive.) In my more recent research, this 2014 article by Mark Sisson mentions that the omega 3 to omega 6 ratio may not matter, and that as long as you are getting enough omega 3, that’s what matters. In my view, eating actual fish is probably better and healthier than taking those fish oil pills.

On Eating Fish

One thing I mentioned in my post on my ordeal with doctors’ bad advice and prescription drugs was that I had been taking fish oil softgels for about 10 years, until I read that it might not be a good idea to take those things regularly in the long term. So I tried to switch to just eating fish. But that was a problem for my sensitive digestive system, for some reason. However, I have been getting the canned sardines again, and having between one-fourth to one-half of the can, like every 4 days or so. (It’s very expensive, though, having it regularly, if you want the higher quality products.)

It’s very important to get that omega 3, and fish is a huge source of that. (Although, as I wrote in this post, too much omega 3 might not be a good thing.) Omega 3 provides an important anti-inflammatory effect, and my particular medical condition is ulcerative colitis, or inflammation of the colon. I’ve also had some issues with osteoarthritis that I determined was to do with excessive vitamin C, and some issues with arm pain that I think that had been to do with magnesium, lack thereof, or too much from supplement form.

So, for me inflammation has been an issue in several ways. And also, one major source or cause of inflammation is stress. Psychological stress can really affect things physically.

Regarding the omega 3 and fish, as I mentioned I have been eating the canned sardines again, mainly to get that omega 3. I had been relying on the “omega 3-enhanced eggs,” which still do not seem to be satisfactory.

Anyway, what got me to do this post was a very informative article by Mark Sisson on his blog, “The Definitive Guide to Fish: Why And How to Eat It.” Bon appétit, everyone.

Antibiotics May Not Be That Helpful, After All

After my post on my ordeal with bad doctors’ advice and bad prescriptions, I had written a post on the possible contributors to my ulcerative colitis, including having taken antibiotics in my earlier years.

Now, an article on GreenMedInfo.com by Dr. Kelly Brogan, MD, gives a thorough, detailed analysis of the side effects of and alternatives to antibiotics.

Dr. Brogan writes that “infections have a natural course with an inbuilt capacity for robust recovery, so we may be giving undue credit to antibiotics,” and that there is “ample evidence that antibiotics take out the ‘good’ with the ‘bad’ bacteria and leave a trail of imbalance that leaves the patient more vulnerable…”

And, “up to a one-third reduction in biome diversity can persist longer than 6 months, even after one short course of the popularly-dispensed antibiotic, Cipro. This decrease in diversity can, itself, be a precursor to new illness. For instance, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of several chronic illnesses associated with low levels of beneficial bacteria. Dysbiosis (imbalanced gut bacteria) is also a precursor to autoimmunity, obesity, and weight gain.”

Among some of the “non-microbiome-based” risks, according to Dr. Brogan, include slowed fracture healing and acute liver injury. And she also notes there are psychiatric risks of antibiotics, including “irritability, confusion, encephalopathy, suicidality, psychosis, and mania,” with further detail on researchers’ findings in that area.

And finally, Dr. Brogan lists some alternatives to antibiotics, including colloidal silver, botanical herbs, probiotics, garlic and Manuka honey, with further explanations regarding each of those alternatives.

Too Much Magnesium from Supplements Now?

Well, it’s yet another magnesium update, with my continued experiences and changes with the magnesium supplements. The latest is this.

So now it turns out that I may have been getting too much magnesium absorbed. I have been taking the WFM 365 magnesium glycinate for maybe two months now, one tablet (supposedly 133 mg) at breakfast and another at dinner. I’m not going to take a third one, as suggested on the label, because it contains too much of that filler stuff, certainly more than the KAL magnesium glycinate does. So because I wasn’t sure if 266 mg magnesium per day was enough, I was taking the Nature Made magnesium citrate (125 mg) between breakfast and lunch.

So now I am learning that too much magnesium in supplement form getting absorbed can be too much, and could affect your other nutrients including potassium and calcium, and could cause side effects, which I had been having. It’s like you just can’t win. Either I have magnesium deficiency because I can’t have the foods that give you the needed magnesium or the supplements are ineffective and/or not getting absorbed, or I’m getting too much magnesium absorbed. Stop the world, I’m getting off.

So I had been having that “too-much-magnesium headache” again indicating too much magnesium absorbed, but also other symptoms which it turns out are similar symptoms to magnesium deficiency! Such as muscle weakness, stiffness or cramps, lethargy.

And then I learned that it’s okay to get more than the daily recommended 400 mg magnesium from foods, but not from supplements. That’s different, apparently.

Some articles online are saying that with supplements you shouldn’t go over 350 per day. (And then there is the issue of some supplement makers giving you more than the number of mg per tablet or capsule than the label says, that should be considered as a possibility.)

Luckily, I am able to have my carrot juice (just not actual carrots, because of insoluble fiber), which the label says has 6% of the recommended 400 mg of magnesium. According to my calculations, the carrot juice at 3 servings per day gives me 72 mg/day of magnesium. That’s actually substantial and I should have been counting that. And sources online are saying that my apple juice at 12 mg per 8 oz., 2 per day adds up to 24 mg per day.

And also I have 4 servings of whole milk per day, which info online says is 24 mg magnesium per day. I’m not sure if I believe that. But I will take their word for it.

(I have the milk, which doesn’t bother my digestive issues, besides for its general nutritional benefits, because I read a while ago that milk fat has anti-inflammatory properties, especially directly in the digestive area.)

So adding up my carrot juice. milk and apple juice magnesium (supposedly 120 mg, although I didn’t realize that it was that high until now) with the 266 mg of my 2 tablets per day of magnesium glycinate and that’s 386 mg. Hmmm. So I guess I probably don’t need anything higher from supplements, assuming I’m taking a supplement that really is fully absorbing.

As an aside, I can see why in early 2015 I was experiencing magnesium deficiency with the muscle weakness problem. I had been drinking Ensure beginning in early 2000 during that terrible time with the digestive ordeal. And I was having 4 Ensure Plus (8 oz bottle) per day, up to 2013 when I started to gradually reduce it. It took me that long to realize that it’s not a good idea to drink Ensure in the long term, with its sugar and corn oil, etc.

So by January 2015 I had reduced Ensure to 1 per day, and in those months I was experiencing that muscle weakness problem. Ensure has “magnesium phosphate,” 100 mg. So, it seems that I had been used to the Ensure for that long, and decreasing it caused the magnesium deficiency. By March of 2015 I finally got the magnesium citrate capsules for the first time, and the muscle weakness got a lot better quickly.

But I must say that this whole ongoing ordeal with supplements has been frustrating. So now it seems that if I’m having symptoms that I thought were symptoms of magnesium deficiency, it turns out it could also be magnesium overload or overdose, whatever word you prefer. Frustrating.

And I really believe, as I wrote in my post on my years-long ordeal with the initial ulcerative colitis and the bad doctors and their bad advice that made things worse and bad prescription anti-inflammatories with side effects, that the sensitive condition that I have now would not have been this sensitive had those earlier issues not been so prolonged, with relapses and bleeding BMs throughout the 2000s. So, I blame those doctors for all this, and I probably would have been able to go back to eating actual vegetables and not have had to deal with these supplements and the difficulty associated with them, had it not been for the doctors’ bad advice (and withholding information such as about the acidophilus, which I didn’t learn about until 2005, but I believe the GI doctors do know about!)

Possible Contributors to Ulcerative Colitis

I have written about my having to deal with ulcerative colitis (inflammation of the colon, inflammatory bowel, etc.), including my years-long ordeal with bad or corrupt and dishonest doctors and their bad advice and bad prescription anti-inflammatories and their side-effects. But here I want to mention some of the things that might have contributed to my having the ulcerative colitis in the first place.

Of course, stress has been a major influence on things. But there are other factors.

For starters, before I get into dietary factors, I can see how some things from earlier years might have had an influence on my colon. For example, when I was in middle school, my mother took me to a dermatologist for acne. The acne actually wasn’t that bad and in later years like college I got into the habit of just washing my face later in the day, and that’s helpful. So right there I’m thinking now what a waste of time and money going to the dermatologist was, just for a minor case of acne.

Anyway, the dermatologist gave me prescription for antibiotics. The first one, if I remember correctly after all these 40+ years now, was tetracycline, and then switched to erythromycin. In all these years later, I have learned that it’s not a good idea to take antibiotics except to save one’s life like as a last resort. Antibiotics are terrible for the colon, because, while they kill harmful bacteria they also kill the “good” bacteria, acidophilus, etc. that are necessary for good colon health. So, I took those from about age 12 or 13 until about age 20-22.

And even before that, I was given some kind of antibiotics when I was a baby, according to my mother, who said that I had some kind of serious illness at that early time and so I was given the antibiotics. That was supposedly the explanation later on for why my teeth appeared a little discolored.

Another thing during those earlier years, during high school and maybe into college was that I occasionally had stress-related headaches and took aspirin. Aspirin supposedly promotes bleeding, and isn’t particularly good for the colon, as I learned later on. So, that could be another factor.

Another factor that may have contributed to the ulcerative colitis might have been drinking coffee, although, if I remember correctly, by the mid-1990s I was taking “No-Doz” and Vivarin rather than drinking actual coffee. Caffeine is a known irritant to the colon. At least, that is what I learned during those years. Now, information on the Internet is referring more specifically to coffee. But the problem with coffee is that it’s acidic, and that’s an irritant to the colon. So, two strikes against coffee for someone with ulcerative colitis or an apparent sensitivity to developing UC: acidity and caffeine. I no longer have anything with caffeine, and I haven’t had coffee since the 1990s.

But I have a feeling that the biggest factor in why I developed ulcerative colitis was my eating habits. (What a shock, I know.) During middle school and high school, while I did eat the nutritious food my mother gave us, I rarely ate a breakfast on school days, and the lunch I took to school was this processed lunch meat on plain white bread. So, in my view I was not very well nourished during those important years of development.

But worse was the junk food I ate. I ate those Sara Lee chocolate cakes and cheesecakes, Yodels, Ring-Dings, Ho-Ho’s, Devil Dogs, chocolate chip cookies, and so on. Every day when coming home from school I would have a big “snack” and I’m surprised that I was actually hungry by dinner time. And then after the dinner hour I would have another big “snack” like in the early evening. (No wonder I rarely slept well and maybe got an average of 5 hours of sleep per night!) So those terrible eating habits went on for years.

And I was never over weight, by the way, I was always skinny. It’s like all the junk food went right through and didn’t cause extra weight. And I’m just guessing here, but I’ll bet that all the additives and preservatives, all the synthetic chemicals in those junk foods had some kind of negative effect on my digestive system in general. So, whatever nutrients in the nutritious food I did eat probably wasn’t getting thoroughly absorbed. My conclusion is that I was malnourished especially during those important adolescent years. And the bad foods probably had a terrible long-term effect on my digestive system.

And with all that aforementioned junk food a large part of that was chocolate, which is also an irritant probably because it contains caffeine. I think that (although I’m not sure) specifically sugar is also an irritant to the colon. Those junk foods are obviously high in sugar.

And it took me as late as that 1999-2000 terrible ordeal with the ulcerative colitis and bleeding BMs to finally understand the effects that food has on the digestive system, and I didn’t fully stop eating the junk until April of 2000. And I haven’t had any of that stuff since then either.

Summary of Post on My Medical Ordeal with Bad Doctors and Prescription Drugs

My post on my ordeal with doctors, their bad advice and bad prescription drugs is not the easiest read ever. But if you have, or know someone who has, issues in the lower digestive area, then that post should be informative. One thing I maybe should have done was provide a summary of the post at the top and then be more specific throughout the rest of the post.

So, I will post this new summary here in this post, and add it as an update to that post.

  • It was an ordeal from 1999-2008. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC), or inflammatory bowel, with bleeding BMs.
  • Primary doctor advised that I eat whole wheat and bran to gain weight. (But people with UC shouldn’t eat whole wheat and bran which are irritants to the colon.)
  • Primary doctor had me have an upper GI series, in which the barium caused a return of pylorospasm (spastic pyloris) that caused further aggravation.
  • Prescription anti-inflammatory Asacol caused swelling in legs, feet and ankles, could hardly walk.
  • Switched to sulfasalazine. A colonoscopy doctor advised to increase sulfasalazine in 2001, and a different colonoscopy doctor advised in 2005 to increase it further. Based on an unusually high blood pressure reading at a physical, my research and conclusion were that the 2005-2006 increased sulfasalazine caused depletion of potassium which contributes to higher blood pressure. Reducing sulfasalazine resulted in lower, more normal blood pressure.
  • 2007-08 and onward I emphasized nutritional medicine and supplements. Were issues with fish oil/omega 3, and drinking Ensure for a long period. The biggest help since 2005 in my experience has been the acidophilus probiotic supplement.
  • 2008 colonoscopy the two GI doctors were “not sure” about “regenerative glands with neutrophils” and suggested another colonoscopy in just 6 months. My conclusion was that they were “FOS,” so I didn’t have that. Colonoscopies are very stressful! I had them in 2001, 2005, 2007, and 2008. There were polyps in 2001, but none in any of the subsequent colonoscopies. And I learned that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant that the colon tissue was healing after those initial years of inflammation.
  • In the lengthy post I also mention some of the foods I have, some of which have anti-inflammatory properties.

My Ordeal With Doctors, Bad Advice, and Bad Prescription Drugs

UPDATE: Because this post is kind of a long read, I decided to add a summary of the important points at the top, and then continue with the actual post below the summary.

Here is the summary first:

  • It was an ordeal from 1999-2008. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC), or inflammatory bowel, with bleeding BMs.
  • Primary doctor advised that I eat whole wheat and bran to gain weight. (But people with UC shouldn’t eat whole wheat and bran which are irritants to the colon.)
  • Primary doctor had me have an upper GI series, in which the barium caused a return of pylorospasm (spastic pyloris) that caused further aggravation.
  • Prescription anti-inflammatory Asacol caused swelling in legs, feet and ankles, could hardly walk.
  • Switched to sulfasalazine. A colonoscopy doctor advised to increase sulfasalazine in 2001, and a different colonoscopy doctor advised in 2005 to increase it further. Based on an unusually high blood pressure reading at a physical, my research and conclusion were that the 2005-2006 increased sulfasalazine caused depletion of potassium which contributes to higher blood pressure. Reducing sulfasalazine resulted in lower, more normal blood pressure.
  • 2007-08 and onward I emphasized nutritional medicine and supplements. Were issues with fish oil/omega 3, and drinking Ensure for a long period. The biggest help since 2005 in my experience has been the acidophilus probiotic supplement.
  • 2008 colonoscopy the two GI doctors were “not sure” about “regenerative glands with neutrophils” and suggested another colonoscopy in just 6 months. My conclusion was that they were “FOS,” so I didn’t have that. Colonoscopies are very stressful! I had them in 2001, 2005, 2007, and 2008. There were polyps in 2001, but none in any of the subsequent colonoscopies. And I learned that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant that the colon tissue was healing after those initial years of inflammation.
  • In this post I also mention some of the foods I have, some of which have anti-inflammatory properties.

Now, here is the actual post on my ordeal that went on for years:

I wanted to write a chronicle of my 1999-2008 medical ordeal with the ulcerative colitis (UC), and with the doctors, the doctors’ bad advice and prescription drugs that either made things worse again or caused new problems.

So, here it is.

My ordeal began during the 1999-2000 period. It was better by April 2000, but there were relapses between 2001-2005. It was under control from 2005 until 2012 when there was an unexpected relapse. (If there is bleeding with BMs I call that a “relapse” of inflammation.)

The UC condition has been better since 2013. But it is still a sensitive condition. And I can’t eat a lot of foods/drinks, especially most vegetables, so I have to have various supplements such as magnesium, zinc, vitamin K and K2, etc., as I have mentioned before. I did go through a lot of “trial and error” with foods at times between 2000 and the later 2000s. But I never have foods now that could aggravate things (not knowingly, anyway). And I have foods that actually have anti-inflammatory properties.

To begin, in September and October 1999 there were about 10-15 times to the bathroom per day, and with bleeding. The bleeding was probably stimulating the extra BMs. The primary doctor during that period indicated that I had had a low blood count, low protein level, and my weight was in the range of 117-125. (I am approx. 6 feet.)

In September 1999 the proctologist doctor did a “flexible sigmoidoscopy,” diagnosed the UC and prescribed Rowasa enema. Things got better by mid-November and December of 1999.

However, the primary doctor was concerned about my continued low weight, and he suggested I add more calories to gain weight.

The primary doctor suggested I eat bran and whole wheat. At that time I was unaware that bran and whole wheat are irritants to the colon, even with people with normal digestive systems, so I did what was suggested. And by January 2000 the colitis was worse again.

But I didn’t see the relationship between my eating bran and whole wheat and the worsening UC relapse, and continued eating bran and whole wheat. I was also going back to eating normally perhaps a bit too soon. (Perhaps the doctor should have known not to suggest bran and whole wheat to a colitis sufferer?)

Another thing at that time in the primary doctor’s concern over my continued low weight was that he wanted me to have an upper GI series, because he thought there might have been something else going on. So I had a GI series, and I believe that the GI series barium reaggravated a “pylorospasm” (spastic pylorus) that I had during the mid-1980s that interfered with food digestion. The spastic pylorus continued to compound the relapsed colitis symptoms from January through March of 2000.

And so in January 2000 with the UC worse again, with multiple BMs per day and bleeding, this time I was having trouble retaining the Rowasa enema. And then the proctologist gave me Asacol, an oral tablet, which was supposed to be a timed release kind of thing, to prevent systemic absorption.

But apparently not. My side effects of that Asacol included swelling in the lower legs, feet and ankles. At one point, I could hardly walk. And there was also swelling in the scrotum. So the proctologist doctor switched me to sulfasalazine oral tablet (I think the timed release version) combined with Cortifoam, another rectal drug.

Regarding the lower legs/feet/ankle swelling, one of my parents suggested I try compression socks that go up to just below the knee. The swelling almost disappeared by the next day after putting on those socks. But did any doctor suggest the compression socks? Nope.

And so during this time of March 2000 I was also trying to be more conscientious with my eating habits, now that I was a little more informed about the relationship between foods and these digestive issues. My mother suggested Ensure to give me more calories and protein to help me to gain more weight. Of course, none of the doctors suggested that.

Also at that time I was taking Xanax, and I am way against those kinds of things. But I needed something to help me through this whole time that was going on for months now. It was extremely stressful. So with that anti-anxiety drug, the sulfasalazine and drinking Ensure, by April 2000 the condition and symptoms were a lot better (again), and the bleeding was gone.

I continued with the sulfasalazine as an ongoing daily medication. The weight got up to the mid-130s and stayed there maybe for a few years (now it’s about 140-142).

After an August 2001 colonoscopy, that colonoscopy doctor said there was still inflammation in the colon/rectum, so he advised that I go from 1 sulfasalazine tablet 4 times per day to 2 tablets 4 times per day. So I did that. He didn’t ask about or mention anything about foods or suggest any changes in my diet.

There had been bleeding-BM relapses that lasted about 4-5 months each, in 2001, 2002, 2003, and December 2004-April 2005.

In 2004 and 2005 I learned more about “natural anti-inflammatories.” I began taking fish oil softgels around April of 2005 because I learned that they are high in omega 3, which has anti-inflammatory properties. And in late 2005 I began taking acidophilus probiotic pills.

However, just to digress a bit, by about 10 years later I learned that it may not be a good idea to take fish oil or omega 3 supplements in the long term, like more than a year. (For example, see this article.) So I gradually reduced and then eliminated the fish oil softgels and tried to just eat fish, which was recommended. However, the fish was a problem with my sensitive digestive condition. I tried different kinds of fish, and cooking it or fish in a can such as sardines. Alas, it appears that fish causes my digestive system trouble, for some reason.

So as a natural omega 3 alternative to fish, I’ve been getting the cage-free eggs that all say a minimum of 70 mg of omega 3 per egg. Or brands that say it has over 100 mg per egg.

As far as keeping inflammation low or preventing it in the lower digestive area, the acidophilus is most important, as far as I’m concerned. But as I have written quite a bit now on my blog, having foods that have anti-inflammatory properties (such as extra virgin olive oil) is helpful, and not having any kinds of foods that could be pro-inflammatory is helpful (or necessary, in my case). No junk food or processed foods, no insoluble fiber, nuts, etc.

At the August 2005 colonoscopy, the new colonoscopy doctor told me to increase from 2 to 3 sulfasalazine tablets 4 times per day. He said nothing about foods or nutritional supplements at that time. So I increased the sulfasalazine and continued that over the next year.

However, later in 2006 at my annual physical examination, the new primary doctor said my blood pressure was unusually high. It had been on the low side for decades, according to previous doctors. So after some investigation on the Internet, I learned that one possible side effect of sulfasalazine is that it could affect your potassium level. And a low potassium level can cause or contribute to high blood pressure.

So I reduced the sulfasalazine, and the blood pressure went back down to more normal levels. (But now when I check that on the Internet 12 years later, there are no articles mentioning the relationship between sulfasalazine and potassium, as I saw then. Why is this?)

And by the way, regarding sulfasalazine, besides its possibly contributing to reducing potassium level, it also could cause a depletion of folic acid. And folic acid is something that’s very important for colon health! So two different colonoscopy doctors both told me to increase sulfasalazine but did not tell me to make sure I supplement with folic acid! They MUST know about sulfasalazine’s effect on folic acid! So that one bothers me, too. How could they not know that?

My 2007 colonoscopy, by the way, showed a reduction in inflammation, despite my discontinuing anti-inflammatory prescription drugs earlier that year and concentrating on nutritional supplements.

I “discovered” the acidophilus/probiotic supplement in late 2005, and began taking those at that time. I didn’t have any relapses with bleeding between about April 2005 and November 2012, and I attribute that in large part to taking the acidophilus supplement.

In November-December 2012 there was a relapse with bleeding for the first time in 7 years. By early 2013 I realized that the acidophilus I was taking wasn’t as good as it was in the first several years of taking it. The reviews of that particular product on Amazon seemed to confirm my suspicion. So in 2013 I switched to a different acidophilus product. And things have been much better since then.

At my 2007 colonoscopy I told the doctor (not the earlier GI doctor from 1999-2001 but the new one from 2005) about the acidophilus and how that seemed to make things a lot better since two years prior to that. And he said that he was a “big fan” of acidophilus. So I was wondering why, in the previous colonoscopy, he didn’t tell me about the acidophilus/probiotic supplements.

And why didn’t any of my primary doctors tell me during those years?

That colonoscopy doctor did, however, try to push the prescription anti-inflammatory Asacol on me at that time. That was the drug I had in early 2000 that caused swelling in the legs, etc.

Besides trying to push Asacol on me, in the examination room he had coffee mugs with the name “Asacol” on them, and his clipboard he was using had “Asacol” on the top! So this was quite a learning experience. And he was the head of endoscopy/colonoscopy at a major metropolitan hospital at that time!

And then after the 2008 colonoscopy, that same colonoscopy doctor advised that I see another specialist because of some issue with that colonoscopy that the doctor didn’t explain. So I saw that so-called specialist who said that that particular colonoscopy biopsy showed “markedly regenerative glands with neutrophils,” but “indefinite for dysplasia.” The specialist wanted me to go have another colonoscopy in just 6 months!

I asked that “specialist” GI doctor to further clarify the issue. And he said something along the lines that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant either that the colon tissue had been “regenerating” (a good thing), or that it was a sign that there were cells developing that could show “dysplasia” (or possibly cancer cells).

Well, my own conclusion was that “regenerative glands with neutrophils” meant that the colon was really healing after those earlier years of inflammation, bleeding, etc., and that it was not a sign of developing cancer.

And so given how stressful those colonoscopies were for me (including the day-before prep!) I decided to take the chance and not go in for that next requested colonoscopy. I concluded at that time that those doctors were just full of it and that they wanted to make the hospital more money, quite frankly. (And see this.)

By the way, I have not had another colonoscopy since 2008, thank God. And, incidentally, while the 2001 colonoscopy had “old, dried out polyps,” according to that first colonoscopy doctor, my 2005, 2007, and 2008 colonoscopies all showed NO polyps. (Humph! to them for putting me through all this crap, for years, and for no good reason!)

Now, back to my own nutritional treatments. So in the 2007-08 time I continued with acidophilus, fish oil softgels, quercetin (an antioxidant  bioflavonoid), vitamin D, guar gum for soluble fiber, and folic acid, mainly.

As I wrote on my blog, regarding drinking Ensure, it’s probably not a good idea to have that in the long term either. Ensure is high in sugar and has corn oil and corn maltodextrin, as well as a lot of synthetic “vitamin” and mineral ingredients. I started that around March of 2000. In September 2013 I began to gradually decrease that from four 8-oz bottles per day to 3, and then 2, and 1, and my last bottle of Ensure was in June of 2016.

I gradually decreased the fish oil from about early 2014 and stopped that by around March of 2016.

And I’m not saying that my colon is all better, not at all. It’s still a very sensitive condition, and I can’t eat a lot of things, as I mentioned at the top.

Starting in September 2013 I added hard-boiled eggs to my daily diet. In 2014 I added extra-virgin olive oil and carrot juice (100% juice, no fiber). And (I think by 2015 or ’16) I added concord grape juice. And I also have apple juice. It’s 2 servings per day of each of those three juices, which I don’t believe should be a problem (as far as carbohydrates or sugars are concerned, but I could be wrong).

And I also switched from margarine to organic butter. Butter and whole milk contain milk fat, which I had read has anti-inflammatory properties, especially for the digestive system.

An additional thing that I have is whey protein. I know that it’s not a good idea to have too much protein per day, not more than 200 grams, I think. But I don’t have that much. The main reason for the whey protein is that it contains natural amino acids and L-glutamine, which have been shown to repair damaged colon tissue (e.g. damaged from inflammation). And I refuse to take any of those prescription anti-inflammatories, unless I really, really have to.

But I had to learn about all those nutritional factors, for colon support and to help prevent any further ulcerative colitis, from the Internet, not from doctors. And I do extensive research on everything, such as checking multiple sources.

So I didn’t learn one thing about nutrition from any “doctor.” It was quite the opposite, in my view. Doctors were mostly pushing their damn prescription drugs, as well as giving harmful advice, or withholding information.

And that’s been my general experience, especially with this ordeal since 1999. I really believe that my lower digestive condition right now wouldn’t be this sensitive, and that I probably would still be able to have more foods including some vegetables had the first doctor in 1999 not given me bad advice and had I been informed much earlier of the effects of diet, and had I known about the probiotic supplements earlier. I don’t believe that I would have had those relapses (that may have had a cumulative weakening effect on the colon) from 2001-2005 and in 2012.

The Mysticism of Big Pharma Drugs

I was doing some googling on issues related to my ulcerative colitis condition, and found some information on the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. They have a page devoted to their “sponsors,” which include mainly pharmaceutical companies. Nothing, no companies related to nutrition and nutrition therapies. Not one. So, it’s very disappointing, but not surprising. I don’t want to link to it. All you have to do is google “Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation sponsors.”

Very soon I will finally be completing my post on my experiences with doctors, their bad advice and bad prescription drugs and side effects, regarding my ulcerative colitis inflammatory condition, from the 1999-2008 period, and my journey from all that crap to nutritional medicine. But the post is not finished yet.

The truth is, it’s all about nutrition and avoiding foods (and drugs) that can cause inflammation or other issues. But the pharmaceutical companies (and the doctors tied to them, which is to say, most doctors) have invested a lot of time and money into continuing the mysticism of drugs as the way to go for “cures.” Millions of medical patients, their doctors, and the workers of the drug companies have been indoctrinated and brainwashed to have faith in their god, the PILLS!