Monthly Archives: October 2019

Dietary Intervention Shown to Lift Depression

As another follow-up on my post yesterday on depression and psychiatric drugs, I wanted to link to this informative article by Dr. Mercola on how dietary intervention lifts depression.

In the article, Dr. Mercola mentions that both sugary and artificially sweetened beverages have been linked to an increased risk of depression, and he references a study that found that adolescents who have high sodium and low potassium in urine experience more symptoms of depression. He goes into detail as to how sugar negatively affects mental health. And he notes a study showing that young adults being given a Mediterranean diet had a “significant reduction” in depression after 3 weeks, that such a diet can reduce inflammation as well, and he gives some important nutritional information. I’m glad I already have changed my diet, that’s for sure.

Dr. Breggin on How to Stop Taking Psychiatric Drugs

As a follow-up to my post yesterday on depression and the psychiatric drugs, I just wanted to reiterate that if anyone is taking psychiatric drugs and wants to stop, there could be further problems associated with withdrawal.

So, it is best to stop taking the drug gradually, certainly not suddenly. I did include a mention of that in my post yesterday. Dr. Peter Breggin’s book, Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal: A Guide for Prescribers, Therapists, Patients and Their Families, should be of help to those who want to get off the drugs safely. Here is his article about that.

Psychiatric Drugs Are Screwing People Up

Another young couple’s relationship has ended in a suicide, and the surviving one has been charged with involuntary manslaughter for urging her boyfriend to kill himself. The two were Boston College students, and the boyfriend, Alexander Urtula, committed suicide just hours before he was to attend graduation ceremonies at his college.

Allegedly, police found tens of thousands of texts on his phone in which the girlfriend, Inyoung You, was urging him to kill himself. She was even there at the top of the parking garage with him when he jumped off to his death, allegedly. The boyfriend had a history of mental illness, depression, etc. and she allegedly exploited that for her own power trip.

In my opinion, urging someone to do something, no matter how strongly one does so, is not a crime, and she should not be charged. Many people are influenced by many things toward their deciding to do something. But in the end, the individual is responsible for his own decisions and actions and his acting something out by his own free will.

Apparently, the couple’s parents were aware of their abusive relationship, but the parents did nothing. Should those parents also be charged with aiding and abetting a suicide for their not taking preventive action? If you’re going to charge a girlfriend for involuntary manslaughter for being mean and urging her boyfriend to commit suicide, then to be consistent you should charge those close to them who were aware of that abuse but did nothing. So in my opinion, that kind of charge is absurd.

But that is not the point of this post. I would really like to know if the young Alexander Urtula had been taking those prescription anti-depressant drugs or anti-anxiety drugs.

Those drugs, such as Xanax, Zoloft, Luvox, Prozac, valium, etc., have been shown to exacerbate depression and cause suicidal thoughts and behaviors. It is well documented now.

Dr. Peter Breggin has written and spoken extensively on that subject. See his antidepressant drug resource and information page for information.

Dr. Breggin describes exactly how antidepressants can cause further depression or suicidal thoughts and behaviors. For instance: “Antidepressants are neurotoxic, that is, they harm the brain and disrupt its functions. As a result, they cause innumerable kinds of abnormal thinking and behaviors, including mania, suicide and violence. In the process, they cause detectable damage to the brain of the child or adult, and also to the fetus of pregnant mothers who take the drug (See Scientific Section 9).”

This particular case of the two college students is very similar to the Michelle Carter case. In that case, Michelle Carter was a high school student who in 2014 had urged her boyfriend Conrad Roy to commit suicide. Their relationship was a dysfunctional one, apparently. Well, he did commit suicide, Michelle was charged with involuntary manslaughter and then convicted of that, based on her words and nothing else.

The two teens had only been together physically very minimally for a year, but most of their contact had been through texting. Tens of thousands of texts, just like in the current case of the Boston College youths.

Carter was convicted of involuntary manslaughter, and the Massachusetts state Supreme Court upheld the conviction. Apparently, the Justices do not believe in freedom of speech or that individuals are responsible for their own actions. She is appealing the conviction now to the U.S. Supreme Court. But, given the ignorant clowns we have there now, I am not holding my breath.

So the new case of the two Boston College students, Inyoung You and Alexander Urtula, in which Ms. You urged Mr. Urtula to commit suicide, and he did, is a similar case. But I am wondering if those two, like Michelle Carter and Conrad Roy, had been taking those psychiatric drugs, particularly Urtula. And if so, was it the effects of the drugs that had made his depression worse and caused him to have suicidal thoughts?

Dr. Breggin has written quite a bit about the Michelle Carter case, and he was an expert witness at her trial regarding her having been taking antidepressants.

In this article, Dr. Breggin notes that both Carter and her boyfriend Conrad Roy had been taking antidepressants for years. In this other article he shows how her taking Prozac at such a young age ultimately worsened Michelle’s eating disorder and depression. Dr. Breggin notes that children should not be given antidepressants at all.

In fact, I think that antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs are so over-prescribed that many doctors are giving them to patients who are not suffering from chronic, clinical depression but who are just feeling unhappy or depressed at certain times, and it’s the drugs themselves that actually cause a more severe case of depression and even suicidal thoughts! The primary doctors as well as the crazy psychiatrists! Honestly, I think the psychiatrists are addicted to giving out those terrible drugs.

Now, as Jon Rappoport noted in his newly revived blog regarding the harm that psychiatric drugs cause, for those who are taking a psychiatric drug and want to stop, don’t do it suddenly. It must be done gradually and under a knowledgeable practitioner’s supervision. Dr. Breggin has addressed the problems involving psychiatric drug withdrawal.

And I very much recommend that particular post by Jon Rappoport, who describes the history of and relationship between psychiatric drugs and violence, particularly the school shootings in the past two decades.

Many school shootings involved shooters who had been taking antidepressants or anti-anxiety drugs. This article by Sam Jacobs lists some of the many examples of school shootings and workplace violence in which the violent ones were taking psychiatric drugs.

Dr. Breggin has an excellent article asserting that more psychiatry means more shootings. Quite an assertion. But he gives a lot of details to back that up.

And I still believe that the individual is responsible for his own actions, drugs or not. We can’t blame the drug if its user kills someone. BUT, the drugs are contributors to screwing people up, in my opinion.

Dr. Breggin writes: “Not only do psychiatric drugs add to the risk of violence, but psychiatric treatment lulls the various authorities and the family into believing that the patient is now “under control” and “less of a risk.” Even the patient may think the drugs are helping, and continue to take them right up to the moment of violence.”

Again, as Dr. Breggin has shown, those psychiatric drugs can worsen someone’s depression and cause suicidal thoughts and behaviors, as well as violence. And we know that Michelle Carter and her deceased boyfriend were taking psychiatric drugs, so I want to know if this latest couple, Inyoung You and Alexander Urtula, had been taking any psychiatric drugs. Will investigators allow that information to be made public, if it is the case?

And finally, given the epidemic of police suicides in New York City, had any of those officers been taking antidepressants or other psychiatric drugs? That article states that some of them are being “treated” for PTSD. We know what that means.

Furthermore, we know that there is a high number of military veteran suicides and active duty military suicides. The military “doctors” giving the soldiers and vets psychiatric drugs has also been well documented. I’m sure the pharmaceutical companies are benefiting from all this as well.

Autism and Inflammation

An article at Health Impact News, which I very much recommend, discusses some recent studies which show a link between brain inflammation and autism. A Tufts University study calls inflammation the “main driver behind autism,” and a Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center study found “evidence suggesting that an immune response targeting specialized cells in the brain resulted in chronic inflammation in two thirds of autistic brains analyzed postmortem,” according to Health Impact News.

The article points out other past studies showing a linkage between brain inflammation and autism. It also pointed to another study showing a linkage between intestinal inflammation and autism as well. The article notes that “67 percent (of children diagnosed with autism) more likely to be diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) than their peers (not diagnosed with autism).”

The prevalence of autism diagnoses in children seems to have skyrocketed between 1980 and 2002, and especially since 2002.

Now, some particular contributors to brain inflammation and autism, as noted by the article, have been vaccines. Children are being given too many vaccine shots at too young an age.

And based on my own experiences and research, I would say that there are other contributors to inflammation as well.

Stress is a large contributor to inflammation, as shown in this article. And it shouldn’t be too much of a surprise that some children might have symptoms as a result of inflammation, because many children have a lot of emotional stress in their lives, especially those who are abused, molested, or neglected in the home.

Also, since the September 11th terrorist attacks of 2001, also known as 9/11, little children have been further stressed and terrorized by constant government pronouncements that “the terrorists are out to get us,” as repeated in the news media. The kids also are now exposed to totally unnecessary terrorism drills in the schools, and traveling children have been the victims of abuse, molesting and groping by TSA agents.

I don’t know how many photos or videos I have seen online or articles I’ve read regarding the crying little kids being criminally molested by the airport gestapo who believe that every little kid (and Grandma) is a terror suspect and anal cavity searches are in order. It’s sick.

Besides the TSA gestapo, the exaggerated terror threat and invasive “security” procedures that George W. Bush and Dick Cheney have caused and Obama and Trump have continued to authorize, today’s children are also having to deal with stressful situations in their own families. They have to deal with a mommy who is too distracted with her precious iPhone and texting while ignoring and neglecting her kid, or a daddy who is too preoccupied with his Internet porn, and so on.

So besides the parents too glued to their electronics, the kids themselves are spending too much time on their own devices, staring into screens all day, and that causes emotional stress as well. According to Psychology Today, kids spending too much time staring into their screens causes more stress and problems with sleep and mood, and actually can impede brain development in children.

So I can see how such stresses in a child’s life, certainly more than I had to deal with when I was growing up in the 1960s and ’70s, can contribute to inflammation.

Besides stress, there are other causes of inflammation. According to this 2018 Healthline article, sugar, sugary foods and high fructose corn syrup have been shown to cause more inflammation. But you probably already knew that. “In one study, mice fed high-sucrose diets developed breast cancer that spread to their lungs — in part due to the inflammatory response to sugar,” notes the Healthline article. And, “In another study, the anti-inflammatory impact of omega-3 fatty acids was impaired in mice fed a high-sugar diet.”

Hmm, that explains, at least in part, the ulcerative colitis (inflammation of the colon) relapses I continued to have during the years that I drank Ensure, which is high in sugar, as I wrote in my post on my medical ordeal.

Also in the Healthline article, besides the sugar and high fructose corn syrup, other food related contributors to inflammation include artificial trans fats (as distinguished from natural trans fats found in dairy and meats), vegetable and seed oils (many of which are high in omega 6), refined carbohydrates (“found in candy, bread, pasta, pastries, some cereals, cookies, cakes, sugary soft drinks and all processed food that contains added sugar or flour”), excessive alcohol and processed meat.

I remember as a kid and even into my 20s eating those processed lunch meats. No wonder I had such problems. And I also ate a lot of junk food sweets. I can see the linkage of those products and probable inflammation, and the emotional and behavioral issues I had, as well as the ulcerative colitis I developed later on. I don’t want to say that I had actual “autism” as a kid. But I can say, given my years and experiences with ulcerative colitis, that I had “inflammation.”

Perhaps doctors can look more closely at possible diagnoses of inflammation in kids. People can prevent inflammation, not only by trying to reduce stress and eating foods that are known to have anti-inflammatory properties, but by not eating foods (mentioned above) that are known to cause inflammation.

Avoiding spending too much time staring into your electronics and screens can’t hurt either.

And I know I’ve thrown a lot of ideas into this one post, but it’s important to make connections, such as between autism and inflammation, and the causes of inflammation.

World War II Veteran Simone Faflick Has Died

World War II veteran Simone Leboulanger Faflick has died at the age of 96. I knew her during the 1980s during my college years, and she was a very nice lady and an excellent teacher. Simone was born in France and went with her family to Algiers in North Africa during the start of World War II. After her experiences as a Second Lieutenant during the war, in which she was a translator for American, British and French personnel, she came to the U.S. and settled in Lexington, Massachusetts and she taught French at Boston University.

I had done some Googling, and found this page on North Africa 1942-43 survivors’ stories. Apparently a documentary film had been in the works, and the website includes some video excerpts with veterans, including an interview of Mme Faflick.

In the article on Simone Faflick it mentions that during the first year of the war, she had been a student at the University of Algiers while her parents ran a school for children. But in a short time she and her parents were not able to return to visit Brittany in France because of the German subs.

As a student Simone was part of a French resistance movement, and, according to the article, in 1942 her fellow student Ferdinand Bonnier de la Chapelle had assassinated Admiral Francois Darlan, a Nazi Germany collaborator. As part of the interviews for that WWII veterans project mentioned above, Simone explains the incident here. Bonnier de la Chapelle was tried and executed the next day, but a posthumous acquittal after the war noted that his assassinating Admiral Darlan was “in the interest of liberation of France.”

That sure must have been quite a thing for Simone to have known that kind of dedicated resister of fascism.

The article also quotes from Simone’s diary from the war years, in which she described some of her more intense moments during the war. In one instance, prior to her being made a Second Lieutenant and beginning work as a translator in 1943, Simone wrote:

“One morning was as I was riding the bus, there were the shrieking sounds of sirens. Everyone had to get off the bus. I could not miss my class. Taking a detour through a small park I felt somewhat protected by the trees. Once in the avenue I started running from building to building, stopping at each doorstep to inspect the sky. I did get to my class alive and in time. Another day, a very gruesome sight welcomed the students at the University. A German soldier, all entangled in his parachute, had fallen and died impaled by the spikes of the main gate.”

I am certainly impressed that SImone was a part of a Gaullist French resistance movement with other students, and I’m sure glad that she was able to survive throughout the war in North Africa and come to the U.S. and teach French at B.U.

My Latest Pet Peeves

I realize it’s been a while since I’ve written anything here, and I want to do more. But I guess it’s a combination of very busy and hectic, and when I have wanted to write something I just haven’t been feeling creative enough. My mother and brother and I had a visit recently for the first time since our visit in May, which was our first visit since my father died in March. They live in a different state. So I think it’s time to sit here and write what comes to mind, especially regarding my latest pet peeves.

I have been enjoying writing about my experiences with my dietary and medical situations, as well as comments I have on the various issues of the day and especially in the medical and nutritional area. Lately some of the issues have involved the vaccines controversy. I don’t think I’ve seen so much social conflict regarding vaccines in all my years of paying attention to the news. That’s roughly 40 years now.

WHY is the vaccine issue so controversial? Because of ignorance? Propaganda? People seem to be more influenced by propaganda these days than any time that I can remember. Does Big Pharma have that much of an influence on people? That is why, instead of listening to the hysterical propagandists, people need to read more, such as this article and this article on the vaccines.

And it isn’t just the vaccine issue, but politics, such as the move to get rid of Trump at all cost. Such as, “Russia collusions” in which Trump was exonerated by the final Mueller report, yet for 2 years “we know he’s guilty,” as the war monger GWB would say. (And I’m not a Trump supporter. The guy loves government planning and control, the police state and the drug war. So, I’m for freedom and he is not!) And now it’s some damn phone call with the Ukrainian president. I guess the CIA really wants him out.

So one of my current pet peeves is the ongoing propaganda propelled by the news media in coordination with the hacks in Washington who don’t believe in democracy and free and fair elections. Anti-democracy is also alive and well in England (that’s what “the U.K.” used to be called, in case you didn’t know), with the rulers in England continuing to delay their separation from the European Union for over 3 years now even though the majority of the voters in England voted to leave the EU!

Besides the propaganda influences on people with the vaccine issue and politics, I have other pet peeves, including tech issues and shopping. I have had the same DSL modem for 10 years now, and in late August it had been having a big problem. So in my trying to find a replacement modem it seems difficult to find something appropriate. Is it true that most people now have cable? No more DSL? Am I the only one? Several aspects of this include the fact that I don’t drive and I’m not going to take 3 different buses to get to a Staples or Best Buy, although I did get to a Best Buy in the downtown area and the 2 salespeople there were either just dishonest and trying to sell me a cable modem (which doesn’t work with DSL service) even though I was asking for DSL modems, or they were genuinely ignorant of the fact that cable modems don’t work with DSL. Everything they had there was cable only, no DSL! And I don’t want to order something online and have it delivered either. But I did eventually find a modem. And my 10-year-old modem has been working again ever since that day in August so I’ll switch to the new one when the current one has another big problem. So, that’s another one of my pet peeves.

And in my building the apartment above mine has the thermostat that controls the heat for the whole building. Over the years (and I’ve been here for a long time), there have been tenants in that unit above who obviously were not informed that having a window open when it was very cold out during the heating season would affect the thermostat and make the heat stay on too long. And also there have been tenants in that unit who have tried to adjust the radiators with the shut-off valve at the floor which you’re not supposed to do. That not only caused their room to not heat up at the same rate as everyone else’s, and thus causing the thermostat to “think” that the heat should stay on longer (and longer and longer, etc., etc.), but in the past had caused their radiators to leak down on me! Also in the past the thermostat had problems despite any of those external factors and was just malfunctioning, so heat stayed on forever and it got very hot, or heat wouldn’t come on at all when it was very cold. So now there’s a relatively new tenant in that unit who I think has had their air conditioner on. And now when the heat starts to come on the usual clang noises are louder like more “thunk” and “clunk” with the clang. I think it involves the pumping mechanism for the steam/forced hot water. I hope it doesn’t cause a disaster.